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ARVO 2016: ProgSTAR, FFB-CRI’s Stargardt Disease Patient Study, Highlighted

Janet Cheetham, ProgSTAR's liaison to FFBOne of the hot topics at ARVO 2016 is ProgSTAR, the natural history study for people with Stargardt disease funded by the Foundation Fighting Blindness Clinical Research Institute (FFB-CRI). I caught up with Janet Cheetham, Pharm.D., the project’s liaison to FFB, to explain why the effort is important to therapy development. Having spent more than three decades in the development of retinal and ophthalmological treatments at Allergan, she brings a wealth of insight and knowledge to her role.

What is ProgSTAR, and why is the study so important to therapy development?
We have 12 clinical sites around the world assessing the progression, over time, of Stargardt disease in more than 250 children and adult patients. By gaining an understanding of disease progression, we’ll be able to recommend the efficacy measures—for example, changes in vision and/or retinal structure—that will be most efficient and reliable for evaluating potential therapies in clinical trials.

The information is being shared publicly through papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals. In addition, when the study and the reports are completed, the ProgSTAR database (without patients’ private information) will be made available to researchers and companies developing therapies. We’re confident the information will help tremendously in designing and launching clinical trials.

Why did FFB-CRI take the initiative to launch ProgSTAR?
FFB took the lead to launch this study because of the gap in understanding of Stargardt disease, which is the leading cause of inherited macular degeneration. It’s imperative that we improve our understanding of the disease to select reliable efficacy measures in clinical trials of one or two years’ duration. It’s very difficult to attract investors to fund development of a therapy if a single clinical trial must be conducted for five years to determine if a therapy is saving vision. It’s just too expensive.

How many presentations on ProgSTAR are being made at ARVO this year? Can you tell us about one?
I am delighted to report there are nine ARVO presentations of interim results from ProgSTAR. The one that I’m most interested in will discuss the changes in the size of lesions—i.e., the area of degeneration—and how that correlates with the rate of change in visual acuity. The reason this is important is that measuring visual acuity—that is, having the patient read an eye chart—is often not reliable. Results from acuity tests can vary significantly. However, even subtle changes in retinal structure are likely to be captured more quickly and accurately. That’s our hope, and we launched ProgSTAR to see if we could scientifically prove this to be true.

How much has FFB-CRI invested in ProgSTAR?
We’ll have spent about $6 million for the study, when it is completed. While this is a significant amount of money, it is well worth it because we have the opportunity to not only accelerate development of Stargardt disease therapies, but attract more companies and researchers to the space. With better clinical-trial endpoints, companies are more likely to invest in therapy development.

Pictured, above: Janet Cheetham, Pharm.D., ProgSTAR’s liaison to FFB, attending ARVO 2016.


18 Responses to 'ARVO 2016: ProgSTAR, FFB-CRI’s Stargardt Disease Patient Study, Highlighted'

  1. judy says:

    Can you please keep me updated on stargardt disease progress as my daughter has it and is not coping very well emotionally.

    • EyeOnTheCure says:

      Judy, you will be pleased to know that the Foundation Fighting Blindness is partnering with Sanofi Pharmaceuticals on a gene therapy clinical trial for Stargardt disease. For more information on this trial, see the following link:
      http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01367444?term=stargardt&recr=Open&no_unk=Y&rank=2 In order to participate in this or any other gene therapy trial, you must first obtain a molecular (genetic) diagnosis. For information on genetic testing, please see the following web link to download a PDF document: http://www.blindness.org/sites/default/files/genetic_testing_booklet_201311rev.pdf

      You should also consider enrolling in “My Retina Tracker”, a free registry that helps link people with retinal disease to appropriate clinical trials that are recruiting. For more information on “My Retina Tracker” please see the following web link: https://www.myretinatracker.org/

      Of general interest, there is a “Stargardt – Macular Degeneration” Facebook page where people can communicate with other people affected by Stargardt disease. Here is the link: https://www.facebook.com/groups/Stargardts/

      Finally, below is a list of pharmaceutical companies that are developing therapies for Stargardt Disease:

      Acucela,( http://www.acucela.com/) is a Seattle-based biotechnology company that is developing several drugs for retinal diseases such as AMD, dry eye, diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and Stargardt disease. Acucela’s visual cycle modulators (VCM) reduce the activity of the rod visual system — in essence, “slowing it down” and reducing the metabolic load on the retina. Reducing the speed of the visual cycle has been shown to protect the retina from light damage and reduce the accumulation of retinal-related toxic by-products, including A2E, which is implicated in both Stargardt disease and dry AMD. The Company’s lead investigational compound (Emixustat™) is currently in Phase 3 trials for dry AMD. Once approved by the FDA, Emixustat could be prescribed for Stargardt disease.

      Ocata Therapeutics (https://www.ocata.com/), a Santa Monica-based biotechnology company, has developed an RPE cell line that is derived from embryonic stem cells (ESC). Studies have shown that the subretinal transplantation of ESC-RPE cells in a rat RP model resulted in 100% visual function rescue. Functional rescue was also achieved in the Stargardt mouse model with near-normal functional measurements recorded at more than 70 days. The RPE cell transplantation studies are now in Phase 2 human clinicals. Here is the link to the Clinical Trials.Gov recruitment web page: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01469832?term=advanced+cell+technology&rank=2
      *Note: It is not known how long the transplanted RPE cells will last in a human patient with Stargardt disease. Unless gene or pharmaceutical-based augmentation treatment is coupled to the RPE transplant, toxic A2E will continue to be produced and eventually kill the RPE cells.

      Alkeus, (http://alkeus.com/) Alkeus has developed a form of vitamin A that upon light interaction, does not form toxic vitamin A metabolites and A2E. Alkeus’ lead compound, ALK-001, is an oral compound with a well-understood mechanism of action. ALK-001 was specifically designed to treat Stargardt disease by preventing the formation of these toxic vitamin A dimers in the eye. Alkeus is currently recruiting patients for a Phase 2 human clinical trial. Here is the link to the clinical trials.gov recruitment page: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02402660

      Vision Medicine (Previously Visum) The Foundation Fighting Blindness is partnering with Vision Medicine to develop a small molecule therapy Stargardt disease. Vision Medicine’s novel approach proposes to develop drugs that will temporarily control levels of A2E in the eye and preserve the natural vision cycle, leading to a therapeutic treatment. Vision Medicine has discovered a unique chemical approach to sequester rather than eliminate A2E. Through this process, 25 diverse FDA approved drugs demonstrating both mechanistic and in vivo efficacy have been identified. Vision Medicine has identified a lead compound, VM 200, which is an enantiomer of an FDA approved drug that demonstrates complete retinal protection in preclinical studies. Vision Medicine plans to conduct Phase I and Phase II clinical trials in the near future.

      To read more about the partnership between Vision Medicine and FFB, see the following web link:
      http://www.blindness.org/foundation-news/foundation-fighting-blindness-partners-vision-medicines-develop-stargardt-disease

      I hope you find this information helpful. Please feel free to contact me if you have any other questions or concerns.Thank you for your support that is enabling the development of new treatments for degenerative retinal disease.

    • Catherine Bohbot says:

      Where do you live.

  2. Jamie says:

    I am a 42 yr old African American woman who was diagnosed at the age of 20 with Stargarts. i was told then I would go blind but in recent yrs I’ve been told by Asheville eye and occosiates that the disease appears to be stabilized. my vision now is 20/400 in one eye and 20/600 in other. How can I become apart of your Study?

    • EyeOnTheCure says:

      You will be pleased to know that the Foundation Fighting Blindness is partnering with Sanofi Pharmaceuticals on a gene therapy clinical trial for Stargardt disease. For more information on this trial, see the following link:
      http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01367444?term=stargardt&recr=Open&no_unk=Y&rank=2 In order to participate in this or any other gene therapy trial, you must first obtain a molecular (genetic) diagnosis. For information on genetic testing, please see the following web link to download a PDF document: http://www.blindness.org/sites/default/files/genetic_testing_booklet_201311rev.pdf

      You should also consider enrolling in “My Retina Tracker”, a free registry that helps link people with retinal disease to appropriate clinical trials that are recruiting. For more information on “My Retina Tracker” please see the following web link: https://www.myretinatracker.org/

      Of general interest, there is a “Stargardt – Macular Degeneration” Facebook page where people can communicate with other people affected by Stargardt disease. Here is the link: https://www.facebook.com/groups/Stargardts/

      Finally, below is a list of pharmaceutical companies that are developing therapies for Stargardt Disease:

      Acucela,( http://www.acucela.com/) is a Seattle-based biotechnology company that is developing several drugs for retinal diseases such as AMD, dry eye, diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and Stargardt disease. Acucela’s visual cycle modulators (VCM) reduce the activity of the rod visual system — in essence, “slowing it down” and reducing the metabolic load on the retina. Reducing the speed of the visual cycle has been shown to protect the retina from light damage and reduce the accumulation of retinal-related toxic by-products, including A2E, which is implicated in both Stargardt disease and dry AMD. The Company’s lead investigational compound (Emixustat™) is currently in Phase 3 trials for dry AMD. Once approved by the FDA, Emixustat could be prescribed for Stargardt disease.

      Ocata Therapeutics (https://www.ocata.com/), a Santa Monica-based biotechnology company, has developed an RPE cell line that is derived from embryonic stem cells (ESC). Studies have shown that the subretinal transplantation of ESC-RPE cells in a rat RP model resulted in 100% visual function rescue. Functional rescue was also achieved in the Stargardt mouse model with near-normal functional measurements recorded at more than 70 days. The RPE cell transplantation studies are now in Phase 2 human clinicals. Here is the link to the Clinical Trials.Gov recruitment web page: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01469832?term=advanced+cell+technology&rank=2
      *Note: It is not known how long the transplanted RPE cells will last in a human patient with Stargardt disease. Unless gene or pharmaceutical-based augmentation treatment is coupled to the RPE transplant, toxic A2E will continue to be produced and eventually kill the RPE cells.

      Alkeus, (http://alkeus.com/) Alkeus has developed a form of vitamin A that upon light interaction, does not form toxic vitamin A metabolites and A2E. Alkeus’ lead compound, ALK-001, is an oral compound with a well-understood mechanism of action. ALK-001 was specifically designed to treat Stargardt disease by preventing the formation of these toxic vitamin A dimers in the eye. Alkeus is currently recruiting patients for a Phase 2 human clinical trial. Here is the link to the clinical trials.gov recruitment page: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02402660

      Vision Medicine (Previously Visum) The Foundation Fighting Blindness is partnering with Vision Medicine to develop a small molecule therapy Stargardt disease. Vision Medicine’s novel approach proposes to develop drugs that will temporarily control levels of A2E in the eye and preserve the natural vision cycle, leading to a therapeutic treatment. Vision Medicine has discovered a unique chemical approach to sequester rather than eliminate A2E. Through this process, 25 diverse FDA approved drugs demonstrating both mechanistic and in vivo efficacy have been identified. Vision Medicine has identified a lead compound, VM 200, which is an enantiomer of an FDA approved drug that demonstrates complete retinal protection in preclinical studies. Vision Medicine plans to conduct Phase I and Phase II clinical trials in the near future.

      To read more about the partnership between Vision Medicine and FFB, see the following web link:
      http://www.blindness.org/foundation-news/foundation-fighting-blindness-partners-vision-medicines-develop-stargardt-disease

      I hope you find this information helpful. Please feel free to contact me if you have any other questions or concerns.Thank you for your support that is enabling the development of new treatments for degenerative retinal disease.

  3. Amanda loper says:

    Please put me in contact with this clinical trial . I live in Alabama and I have stargardts disease . Nobody ever thinks about people in the south for clinical trials !! My sister also has it . I pray every day my kids don’t get it . I am only 35 and I’ve had it since I was 22 after my first son was born. Please somebody give me some hope!!

    • EyeOnTheCure says:

      You will be pleased to know that the Foundation Fighting Blindness is partnering with Sanofi Pharmaceuticals on a gene therapy clinical trial for Stargardt disease. For more information on this trial, see the following link:
      http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01367444?term=stargardt&recr=Open&no_unk=Y&rank=2 In order to participate in this or any other gene therapy trial, you must first obtain a molecular (genetic) diagnosis. For information on genetic testing, please see the following web link to download a PDF document: http://www.blindness.org/sites/default/files/genetic_testing_booklet_201311rev.pdf

      You should also consider enrolling in “My Retina Tracker”, a free registry that helps link people with retinal disease to appropriate clinical trials that are recruiting. For more information on “My Retina Tracker” please see the following web link: https://www.myretinatracker.org/

      Of general interest, there is a “Stargardt – Macular Degeneration” Facebook page where people can communicate with other people affected by Stargardt disease. Here is the link: https://www.facebook.com/groups/Stargardts/

      Finally, below is a list of pharmaceutical companies that are developing therapies for Stargardt Disease:

      Acucela,( http://www.acucela.com/) is a Seattle-based biotechnology company that is developing several drugs for retinal diseases such as AMD, dry eye, diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and Stargardt disease. Acucela’s visual cycle modulators (VCM) reduce the activity of the rod visual system — in essence, “slowing it down” and reducing the metabolic load on the retina. Reducing the speed of the visual cycle has been shown to protect the retina from light damage and reduce the accumulation of retinal-related toxic by-products, including A2E, which is implicated in both Stargardt disease and dry AMD. The Company’s lead investigational compound (Emixustat™) is currently in Phase 3 trials for dry AMD. Once approved by the FDA, Emixustat could be prescribed for Stargardt disease.

      Ocata Therapeutics (https://www.ocata.com/), a Santa Monica-based biotechnology company, has developed an RPE cell line that is derived from embryonic stem cells (ESC). Studies have shown that the subretinal transplantation of ESC-RPE cells in a rat RP model resulted in 100% visual function rescue. Functional rescue was also achieved in the Stargardt mouse model with near-normal functional measurements recorded at more than 70 days. The RPE cell transplantation studies are now in Phase 2 human clinicals. Here is the link to the Clinical Trials.Gov recruitment web page: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01469832?term=advanced+cell+technology&rank=2
      *Note: It is not known how long the transplanted RPE cells will last in a human patient with Stargardt disease. Unless gene or pharmaceutical-based augmentation treatment is coupled to the RPE transplant, toxic A2E will continue to be produced and eventually kill the RPE cells.

      Alkeus, (http://alkeus.com/) Alkeus has developed a form of vitamin A that upon light interaction, does not form toxic vitamin A metabolites and A2E. Alkeus’ lead compound, ALK-001, is an oral compound with a well-understood mechanism of action. ALK-001 was specifically designed to treat Stargardt disease by preventing the formation of these toxic vitamin A dimers in the eye. Alkeus is currently recruiting patients for a Phase 2 human clinical trial. Here is the link to the clinical trials.gov recruitment page: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02402660

      Vision Medicine (Previously Visum) The Foundation Fighting Blindness is partnering with Vision Medicine to develop a small molecule therapy Stargardt disease. Vision Medicine’s novel approach proposes to develop drugs that will temporarily control levels of A2E in the eye and preserve the natural vision cycle, leading to a therapeutic treatment. Vision Medicine has discovered a unique chemical approach to sequester rather than eliminate A2E. Through this process, 25 diverse FDA approved drugs demonstrating both mechanistic and in vivo efficacy have been identified. Vision Medicine has identified a lead compound, VM 200, which is an enantiomer of an FDA approved drug that demonstrates complete retinal protection in preclinical studies. Vision Medicine plans to conduct Phase I and Phase II clinical trials in the near future.

      To read more about the partnership between Vision Medicine and FFB, see the following web link:
      http://www.blindness.org/foundation-news/foundation-fighting-blindness-partners-vision-medicines-develop-stargardt-disease

    • Lucas Carmo says:

      I have Stargardt too. I recommend that you do a DNA test to find out what gene causes you to have Stargardt. It’s been quite hard for me as well! I have had since i was 8 and now I am 22. I don’t know what to do with my life.

      • Dr. Tim Schoen says:

        There are two types of Stargardt disease: dominant and recessive. Dominant Stargardt disease is quite rare and the gene involved is ELOVL4. Recessive Stargardt disease is the more common form and is caused by mutations in the ABCA4 gene. The Foundation Fighting Blindness is partnering with Sanofi Pharmaceuticals on a gene therapy clinical trial for Stargardt disease caused by mutations in ABCA4. For more information on this trial, see the following link:
        http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01367444?term=stargardt&recr=Open&no_unk=Y&rank=2 In order to participate in this or any other gene therapy trial, you must first obtain a molecular (genetic) diagnosis. For information on genetic testing, please see the following web link to download a PDF document: http://www.blindness.org/sites/default/files/genetic_testing_booklet_201311rev.pdf
        You should also consider enrolling in “My Retina Tracker”, a free registry that helps link people with retinal disease to appropriate clinical trials that are recruiting. For more information on “My Retina Tracker” please see the following web link: https://www.myretinatracker.org/

        Below is a list of companies that are developing treatments for Stargardt Disease:

        Sanofi (http://en.sanofi.com/index.aspx) Gene therapy offers a viable alternative to pharmaceutical therapy. With gene replacement therapy, a normal ABCA4 gene is introduced into photoreceptor cells to supplant the function of the defective gene. FFB-supported scientist, Dr. Rando Allikmets, was the first individual to show that a lentivirus could be used to deliver a normal ABCA4 gene into photoreceptor cells of the ABCA4 mutant mouse. Dr. Allikmet’s gene therapy studies have led to a collaboration between Sanofi and the Foundation Fighting Blindness to develop a gene therapy treatment Stargardt disease. A Phase I/II human clinical trial evaluating Stargen™ was initiated in 2011. The Phase I/II trial is currently taking place in Paris, Oregon, Texas and Florida. For more information, see the following link: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01367444?term=stargardt&rank=3

        Alkeus, (http://alkeus.com/) Alkeus has developed a form of vitamin A that upon light interaction, does not form toxic vitamin A metabolites and A2E. Alkeus’ lead compound, ALK-001, is an oral compound with a well-understood mechanism of action. ALK-001 was specifically designed to treat Stargardt disease by preventing the formation of these toxic vitamin A dimers in the eye. Alkeus is currently recruiting patients for a Phase 2 human clinical trial. Here is the link to the clinical trials.gov recruitment page: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02402660

        Vision Medicines (http://visionmedicines.com/index.html) is developing VM200, an oral small molecule drug candidate for the treatment of Stargardt disease. Stargardt disease is caused by mutations in a key transporter called ABCA4, which lead to the buildup of toxic vitamin A aldehydes and derivatives in the retina to cause blindness. VM200 neutralizes the toxic vitamin A aldehyde and has the potential to be the first treatment for the disease. For a more detailed overview of VM200, please see the following weblink: http://visionmedicines.com/pdf/VM200-Overview-Presentation.pdf
        To read more about the partnership between Vision Medicine and FFB, see the following web link: http://www.blindness.org/foundation-news/foundation-fighting-blindness-partners-vision-medicines-develop-stargardt-disease

        Astellas Pharma (https://www.astellas.us/ ) acquired Ocata Therapeutics in May of 2016. Headquartered in Marlborough, Massachusetts and supported by a research team in Tsukuba, Japan, Astellas serves as a global hub for regenerative medicine and cell therapy research in ophthalmology and other therapeutic areas that have few or no available treatment. At the present time, the RPE transplantation studies have been completed and the Phase 3 trial has yet to be announced. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01469832?term=advanced+cell+technology&rank=2

  4. Bill Reynolds says:

    My 54 year old son has Stargarts – was diagnosed several years ago . He still works and drives daily about 50 miles. If any progress is made in therapy, will you please notify me ? Do you think he would qualify for Social Security Disability ? He is a school teacher.

  5. L A says:

    Great strides are being made in research and therapy for those suffering with Stargardt’s Disease.
    I am a mother of five and three of my children(ages 15, 13 & 10) have Stargardt’s Disease.
    I am excited to see all of the progress being made toward a cure.
    Thank you for your hard work!

  6. Richard Evans says:

    very cool, I hope they will include us older folks someday in the trals. I am 44 and don’t remember having what you would call normal vision. I could see better when I was younger but never good. it will be a fine day when I can see “good”.
    Thank You now getg back to work

  7. Cheryl Pribanich says:

    Please keep me updated on any progress.

  8. YRichard and Fanny says:

    Great initiative. It gives hope to patients suffering from Stargardt.
    Please infom us because my daughter is diagnosed with Stargardt since her 18th. Now she is 23 and struggling with this terrible sight loss. Thnx for cooperation

  9. Diane Henrotin says:

    My son is 46 year old and was diagnosed with Stargart at around 20 yrs old. We live in Southern California near University of California in Irvine UCI. Please let us know if there is a local trial or group he can work with to help him cope with this disease. Thank you and give any new forms of therapy.

    • Dr. Tim Schoen says:

      Dear Diane,

      You will be pleased to know that there are currently several clinical trials taking place for Stargardt disease. For more information, please see the list below:

      Sanofi (http://en.sanofi.com/index.aspx) Gene therapy offers a viable alternative to pharmaceutical therapy. With gene replacement therapy, a normal ABCA4 gene is introduced into photoreceptor cells to supplant the function of the defective gene. FFB-supported scientist, Dr. Rando Allikmets, was the first individual to show that a lentivirus could be used to deliver a normal ABCA4 gene into photoreceptor cells of the ABCA4 mutant mouse. Dr. Allikmet’s gene therapy studies have led to a collaboration between Sanofi and the Foundation Fighting Blindness to develop a gene therapy treatment Stargardt disease. A Phase I/II human clinical trial evaluating Stargen™ was initiated in 2011. The Phase I/II trial is currently taking place in Paris, Oregon, Texas and Florida. For more information, see the following link: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01367444?term=stargardt&rank=3

      Acucela,( http://www.acucela.com/) is a Seattle-based biotechnology company that is developing several drugs for retinal diseases such as AMD, dry eye, diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and Stargardt disease. Acucela’s visual cycle modulators (VCM) reduce the activity of the rod visual system — in essence, “slowing it down” and reducing the metabolic load on the retina. Reducing the speed of the visual cycle has been shown to protect the retina from light damage and reduce the accumulation of retinal-related toxic by-products, including A2E, which is implicated in both Stargardt disease and dry AMD. The Company’s lead investigational compound (Emixustat™) completed Phase 3 trials for dry AMD in June 2016. Unfortunately, the drug failed to slow lesion growth in over 500 patients with geographic atrophy, a form of dry AMD. However, because of a strong demonstration of efficacy in the Stargardt mouse model, Acucela has initiated a Phase 2 trial for patients affected by Stargardt disease. For information on the trial, please see the following link: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03033108?term=acucela&rank=4

      Astellas Pharma (https://www.astellas.us/ ) acquired Ocata Therapeutics in May of 2016. Headquartered in Marlborough, Massachusetts and supported by a research team in Tsukuba, Japan, Astellas serves as a global hub for regenerative medicine and cell therapy research in ophthalmology and other therapeutic areas that have few or no available treatment. At the present time, the RPE transplantation studies have been completed and the Phase 3 trial has yet to be announced. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01469832?term=advanced+cell+technology&rank=2

      Alkeus, (http://alkeus.com/) Alkeus has developed a form of vitamin A that upon light interaction, does not form toxic vitamin A metabolites and A2E. Alkeus’ lead compound, ALK-001, is an oral compound with a well-understood mechanism of action. ALK-001 was specifically designed to treat Stargardt disease by preventing the formation of these toxic vitamin A dimers in the eye. Alkeus is currently recruiting patients for a Phase 2 human clinical trial. Here is the link to the clinical trials.gov recruitment page: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02402660

      Vision Medicines (http://visionmedicines.com/index.html) The Foundation Fighting Blindness is partnering with Vision Medicine to develop a small molecule therapy Stargardt disease. Vision Medicines has discovered a unique chemical compound, VM200 that sequesters aldehyde toxins like A2E. Vision Medicines plans to conduct Phase I and Phase II clinical trials in the near future. To read more about the partnership between Vision Medicine and FFB, see the following web link: http://www.blindness.org/foundation-news/foundation-fighting-blindness-partners-vision-medicines-develop-stargardt-disease

  10. odessa raphael says:

    I am Odessa. my cousin, 42 was diagnosed with stargats. please inform us on the cure if any, we are ready to be put on trials

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