FFB-Funded Scientists Report on Nine Promising Translational Research Efforts

Translational research — moving promising science out of laboratories and into clinical trials — is essential to getting vision-saving, retinal-disease treatments out to the millions who need them. With that said, translational research is also costly and high risk and requires extensive clinical development and regulatory knowledge.

SparingVision Formed to Advance Sight-Saving Protein for RP

L to R: Florence Allouche Ghrenassia, PharmD, President, SparingVision; Frédérique Vidal, French Minister of Higher Education, Research and Innovation; José-Alain Sahel, MD, Co-Founder, SparingVision and Fondation Voir & Entendre; David Brint, Chairman, Foundation Fighting Blindness; and Laure Reinhardt, Deputy CEO, Bpifrance

Researchers Find Mutation as Frequent Cause of RP in American Hispanics

A Foundation-funded research collaboration identified a mutation in the gene SAG as a frequent cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) in the American Hispanic population. Eight of the 22 Hispanic families with adRP in their whole-exome-sequencing study had the mutation.

Dinner Raises $425,000 to Support Blindness Research

The Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB), the world’s leading private funder of research aimed at preventing, treating and curing blindness caused by inherited retinal diseases hosted its annual Fashion and Finance Ball on Tuesday, May 16 at New York’s Plaza Hotel. To date, the dinner has raised $425,000 for inherited retinal disease research and donations are continuing to be made.

Clinical Trial Authorized in the U.S. for Emerging LCA 10 Therapy

ProQR, a biotechnology company in the Netherlands, has received authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to start a Phase I/II clinical trial for its therapy known as QR-110, which is being developed for Leber congenital amaurosis type 10 (LCA 10). The genetic retinal condition causes severe vision loss in children.

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