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Posts tagged My Retina Tracker

ARVO 2018: World’s Largest Show and Tell for Innovations in Eye Research

arvo_post_042518In addition to funding sight-saving research, we at FFB work hard to tell the scientific world about it. That’s because knowledge sharing and collaboration are critical to accelerating the advancement of promising therapies. Progress in developing treatments and cures isn’t made in a vacuum.

The best opportunity for us to showcase FFB-funded research is at the annual meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), which is being held April 29 – May 3 this year in Honolulu. More than 11,000 eye researchers from around the world — including five intrepid members from FFB’s science team — will gather to participate in what is essentially a massive “show and tell” of the latest scientific advancements.
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Artist with Usher Syndrome Excited to Register on My Retina Tracker to Drive Retinal Research

Artis Dana Simon at work.In a post at asharedvision.com, artist Dana Simon describes her experience with My Retina Tracker, a free and secure online registry for people with inherited retinal diseases. My Retina Tracker provides researchers with invaluable information that helps them study retinal diseases, and informs patients when their profile matches clinical-trial criteria. Examples of Dana’s artwork can be found on her website.

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For Rare Disease Day – The Many Benefits of Genetic Research

Rare Disease Day logoIt’s apropos that Rare Disease Day 2016 will be held on the rarest day on the calendar—Leap Day, February 29.

However, collectively, rare diseases are not uncommon. About 30 million Americans, nearly 10 percent of our population, are affected by one of 7,000 rare diseases. They’re an important public health issue, making it incumbent upon us to work hard to eradicate them.
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Retinal Researchers May Be Looking for You

A patient registers with My Retina Tracker.One of the biggest challenges in overcoming rare retinal diseases is, well, that they’re rare. There’s limited information about the conditions in humans, making it difficult for researchers to understand why they cause blindness and develop vision-saving treatments.
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2015 Top 10 Retinal-Research Advances

Researcher in a labThe Foundation Fighting Blindness’ scientists, donors and volunteers made 2015 an outstanding year in our fight against blindness. As I tabulated the year’s top 10 research advances—all made possible through FFB funding—I realized that eight are for clinical trials of emerging therapies that are launching or underway.
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Past Sun Exposure Increases AMD Risk

FFB staff members taking preventive measuresIf you’re a young or middle-aged adult who enjoys being outside in the bright sunshine, you’re probably not thinking about the risk for going blind from age-related macular degeneration (AMD). But according to a new study published in the journal Retina, you should be.
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The Top Research Advancements of 2014: How Fast Can We Go?

lab photoAs we approach 2015, it’s inspiring to look back on 2014 and recount the numerous advancements we’ve made in developing vision-saving treatments and cures. When I joined the Foundation nearly a decade ago, virtually nothing was in a human study. We were curing lots of blind mice, and clinical trials seemed elusive. But, today, more than a dozen promising therapies are being evaluated in people, and at least a dozen more clinical trials are expected to begin in the next few years.
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VISIONS 2014 — My Retina Tracker: Track Your Vision and Drive the Research

Rusty BromleyOne of the big challenges with rare retinal diseases is, well, they’re rare. That makes it hard for researchers to find disease-causing genetic mutations and understand why the defects result in vision loss. It also makes it tough to figure out why a disease can progress at such different rates, even for people within the same family. Perhaps what’s most difficult is identifying enough participants for clinical trials for potential therapies.
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Colorado, VISIONS 2014 — See You There!

Colorado skylineIf you were someone affected by a retinal disease, and looking for the perfect event, one which combines the latest research updates with networking opportunities and support sessions, it would look exactly like the one FFB is hosting in Colorado June 19-22  — VISIONS 2014. Roughly 500 Foundation members, associates and researchers will gather at the annual conference, which will also be covered via this blog and social media, for those who can and can’t make it.
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