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Archive for the Gene Therapy Category

Ophthotech to Boost Development of Gene Therapy for Best Disease

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Ophthotech Corporation, a biopharmaceutical company focused on the development of therapies for orphan retinal diseases and age-related macular degeneration, has announced an evolving, commercial partnership with the University of Pennsylvania and University of Florida to develop a gene therapy for Best disease caused by BEST1 mutations.
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FFB Congratulates RPE65 Gene Therapy Researchers for Champalimaud Award

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More than two decades ago, the Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB) began funding RPE65 gene therapy research that led in late 2017 to LUXTURNA™, the first FDA-approved gene therapy for the eye or an inherited condition. Ultimately, the Foundation provided more than $10 million in funding for the groundbreaking effort.
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Forty High-Impact Retinal-Research Efforts Highlighted at FFB-Casey Innovation Summit

Hosted by the Foundation Fighting Blindness and Casey Eye Institute at Oregon Health & Science University, the Innovation Summit for Retinal Cell and Gene Therapy has emerged as one of the most essential events for researchers and companies developing treatments and cures for retinal degenerative diseases.

In its fifth year, the Innovation Summit featured 40 presentations from industry experts from around the world. More than 250 people were in attendance. The event was held on April 27, the day before the annual meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) in Honolulu.
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French Gene Therapy Company Advancing Three Programs for Retinal Diseases

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Horama, a French biotech developing gene therapies for rare eye diseases, was established in 2014 as a spin-off of INSERM, France’s public scientific and technology institute. Today, the company has three gene-therapy development programs underway for rare inherited retinal diseases, targeting people with mutations in the genes PDE6B, RPE65, and RLBP1.
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ARVO 2018: Dr. Shannon Boye Reports on her Emerging Gene Therapy for LCA (GUCY2D)

At the annual ARVO research conference in Honolulu, I had an opportunity to talk with FFB-funded researcher Shannon Boye, PhD, University of Florida, about her advancement of gene therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis (GUCY2D mutations) toward a clinical trial.

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Best Disease Gene Therapy Advances Toward Clinical Trial

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BEST1-Untreated cBest patho MCT1-E66

Untreated retina

BEST1-treated MCT1-E66

Retina treated with gene therapy

Using gene therapy, FFB-funded researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine (Penn Vet) and Perelman School of Medicine have reversed the disease process in a canine model of Best disease, an inherited form of macular degeneration that can lead to severe vision loss in humans. The therapeutic effect of the treatment has been sustained for as long as five years. Results of the study led by Karina Guziewicz, PhD, and Artur Cideciyan, PhD, were published online in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).
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Choroideremia Gene Therapy Moves into Phase 3 Human Study

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Nightstar Therapeutics, a retinal-disease, gene-therapy development company in the UK, is advancing its emerging gene therapy for choroideremia into a Phase 3 clinical trial known as STAR. The study will enroll approximately 140 patients at 18 clinical sites in the US, Europe, Canada, and South America.
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History Is Made: FDA Approves Spark’s Vision-Restoring Gene Therapy

Spark LogoSpark Therapeutics’ vision-restoring RPE65 gene therapy has received marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, becoming the first gene therapy to gain regulatory approval in the U.S. for the eye or any inherited condition.

Known as LUXTURNA™ (voretigene neparvovec), the gene therapy restored vision in a clinical trial for people between the ages of 4 and 44 with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) caused by mutations in the gene RPE65. Study participants with severe vision loss reported putting away their navigational canes, seeing stars, being able to read, and recognizing faces of loved ones. Vision restoration has persisted for at least three years. The treatment is also designed to work for people with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) caused by RPE65 mutations. Continue Reading…

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First Patient Treated in XLRP Gene Therapy Clinical Trial

The surgical team prepares to inject the virus into the back of the eye of the patient A 29-year-old British man is the first person to be treated in a gene therapy clinical trial for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP). Robert MacLaren, MD, the lead investigator for the trial taking place at the Oxford Eye Hospital in the United Kingdom, says the patient is doing well and has gone home. The trial is being run by Nightstar, a biopharmaceutical company in the U.K. developing therapies for inherited retinal diseases. As many as 24 patients will be enrolled in the 12-month trial.

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A Change in Identity Might Someday Save Vision

retina

No, people with inherited retinal diseases don’t have to adopt new names or personas, or go into witness protection programs, to save their vision. But by changing the identity of cells in the retina — namely rods — researchers may someday be able to slow or halt vision loss for those with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other related conditions.

While the innovative therapeutic approach is not ready to be tested in humans, a research team led by Tom Reh, PhD, University of Washington, and Sheng Ding, PhD, University of California, San Francisco, accomplished the feat in mice with RP. The investigators treated rods in the mice with a compound known as photoregulin1 (PR1) that blocked a gene involved in rod development called Nr2e3. That, in turn, reduced the expression (activity) of other rod-associated genes, making the rods less rod-like and more like cones. Doing so stopped retinal degeneration, preserving both rods and cones. Rods and cones are important, because they’re the cells that make vision possible. Results of the PR1 study were published online in the journal Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science.

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