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Posts tagged UshStat

VISIONS 2016 – Dr. Richard Weleber Receives FFB’s Highest Research Honor, Recognized in Touching Video

Dr. Richard WeleberConsidering all that Richard Weleber, M.D., has accomplished over four decades —
including leadership and oversight of clinical trials for emerging retinal-disease therapies and innovations in retina imaging and functional evaluation at the world-renowned Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University — it comes as no surprise that he’s been given FFB’s Llura Liggett Gund Award for career achievement. Dr. Weleber became the 10th recipient of the Foundation’s highest honor, named after FFB co-founder Lulie Gund, during the opening lunch of the VISIONS 2016 conference.
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Promising Research Highlighted at Meeting of Retinal Gene Therapy Experts

genesWhen it comes to fighting blinding retinal diseases, nothing has been more exciting than the advancement of gene therapies into clinical trials. And, with human studies of gene therapies now underway for Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA, RPE65 mutations), Usher syndrome type 1B, Stargardt disease, retinoschisis, choroideremia and retinitis pigmentosa (MERTK mutations), scientists are gaining new knowledge every day about the best technologies and methodologies for gene-therapy development.
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ARVO 2015 Highlight: AMD Gene Therapy Performs Encouragingly in Human Study

an AMD eyeWhile treatments such as Lucentis®, Avastin®, and Eylea® have been saving and restoring vision for people with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) over the last several years, they have a significant drawback: The therapies require regular injections into the eye—in some cases, monthly—for the life of the patient.
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Inspired by Progress in Usher Syndrome Research

Dr. Mark PennesiWhen I first heard about Usher syndrome, the leading cause of combined blindness and deafness, I was 19, fresh out of high school and very privileged for the opportunity to work as a summer student at the Retina Foundation of the Southwest with David Birch, Ph.D. I was quite moved by the patients — their eagerness for any kind of treatment and the fear that they might pass their disease on to other family members. That was almost 20 years ago. Back then, we knew very little about the condition, especially its genetic diversity, and there were no foreseeable therapies.
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