Listen to this page using ReadSpeaker
Posts tagged rp. retinitis pigmentosa

SparingVision Formed to Advance Sight-Saving Protein for RP

L to R: Florence Allouche Ghrenassia, PharmD, President, SparingVision; Frédérique Vidal, French Minister of Higher Education, Research and Innovation; José-Alain Sahel, MD, Co-Founder, SparingVision and Fondation Voir & Entendre; David Brint, and Chairman, Foundation Fighting Blindness; and Laure Reinhardt, Deputy CEO, Bpifrance

L to R: Florence Allouche Ghrenassia, PharmD, President, SparingVision; Frédérique Vidal, French Minister of Higher Education, Research and Innovation; José-Alain Sahel, MD, Co-Founder, SparingVision and Fondation Voir & Entendre; David Brint, Chairman, Foundation Fighting Blindness; and Laure Reinhardt, Deputy CEO, Bpifrance

The development of a vision-saving treatment for people with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is getting a major boost thanks to the formation of the French biotech SparingVision to move it into a clinical trial and out to the international marketplace.

A spin-off of the Institut de la Vision, SparingVision was established to clinically develop and commercialize a protein known as rod-derived cone-viability factor (RdCVF). The emerging therapy performed well in several previous lab studies funded by the Foundation Fighting Blindness. SparingVision’s goal is to launch a clinical trial for the protein in 2019.
Continue Reading…

Valproic Acid’s Effect Too Small in One-Year Clinical Trial

However, researchers identify a potentially powerful endpoint for evaluating emerging therapies in future studies.

Results from a clinical trial sponsored by the Foundation Fighting Blindness Clinical Research Institute (FFB-CRI) indicate that valproic acid, a drug approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for seizure disorders, did not sufficiently preserve vision in people with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). FFB-CRI launched the 90-person study in 2010, because previous lab research, and a published clinical report involving a few patients, had suggested the drug might slow vision loss in people with adRP.
Continue Reading…

First Patient Treated in XLRP Gene Therapy Clinical Trial

The surgical team prepares to inject the virus into the back of the eye of the patient A 29-year-old British man is the first person to be treated in a gene therapy clinical trial for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP). Robert MacLaren, MD, the lead investigator for the trial taking place at the Oxford Eye Hospital in the United Kingdom, says the patient is doing well and has gone home. The trial is being run by Nightstar, a biopharmaceutical company in the U.K. developing therapies for inherited retinal diseases. As many as 24 patients will be enrolled in the 12-month trial.

Continue Reading…

A Renaissance Man with Vision

Louis PosenLouis Posen is one of the coolest guys on the planet. He’s president and CEO of Hopeless Records, a company he founded at the age of 21—despite the fact that he was losing eyesight to retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The 43-year-old is also a National Trustee of the Foundation Fighting Blindness. And he got into the music business by accident.

In high school, he was a punk-rock aficionado, buying records and going to every local concert he could. In film school, he came to appreciate the positive influence art, including music videos, had on people’s lives. But this was a time when many punk groups couldn’t afford to produce the high-quality videos to which many viewers were accustomed.
Continue Reading…

“You Don’t Look Blind”

EyeCure - don't look blind 2 bPerhaps the biggest misconception about people affected by retinal diseases is that they see nothing at all. While some have, indeed, gone completely blind, most are in the process of losing their vision. And depending on the person, and the disease, this takes years or decades. In some cases, central vision goes first, in others, peripheral vision.
Continue Reading…

Playing a Significant Role in a Clinical Trial

Reinhard Rubow (left) and Miikka Terho.It was only a few days after what’s known as a “bionic retina” was implanted behind Miikka Terho’s left eye – the one that had completely lost vision 16 years previously – that he started to “see” again.

Continue Reading…