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Posts tagged rods and cones

FFB-Funded Scientists Report on Nine Promising Translational Research Efforts

Translational research — moving promising science out of laboratories and into clinical trials — is essential to getting vision-saving, retinal-disease treatments out to the millions who need them. With that said, translational research is also costly and high risk and requires extensive clinical development and regulatory knowledge.

The Foundation Fighting Blindness has taken the translational challenge head on by investing more than $75 million in therapy-development projects with strong clinical-trial potential through its Translational Research Acceleration Program (TRAP), which includes Gund-Harrington Scholar Awards.
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SparingVision Formed to Advance Sight-Saving Protein for RP

L to R: Florence Allouche Ghrenassia, PharmD, President, SparingVision; Frédérique Vidal, French Minister of Higher Education, Research and Innovation; José-Alain Sahel, MD, Co-Founder, SparingVision and Fondation Voir & Entendre; David Brint, and Chairman, Foundation Fighting Blindness; and Laure Reinhardt, Deputy CEO, Bpifrance

L to R: Florence Allouche Ghrenassia, PharmD, President, SparingVision; Frédérique Vidal, French Minister of Higher Education, Research and Innovation; José-Alain Sahel, MD, Co-Founder, SparingVision and Fondation Voir & Entendre; David Brint, Chairman, Foundation Fighting Blindness; and Laure Reinhardt, Deputy CEO, Bpifrance

The development of a vision-saving treatment for people with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is getting a major boost thanks to the formation of the French biotech SparingVision to move it into a clinical trial and out to the international marketplace.

A spin-off of the Institut de la Vision, SparingVision was established to clinically develop and commercialize a protein known as rod-derived cone-viability factor (RdCVF). The emerging therapy performed well in several previous lab studies funded by the Foundation Fighting Blindness. SparingVision’s goal is to launch a clinical trial for the protein in 2019.
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A Change in Identity Might Someday Save Vision

retina

No, people with inherited retinal diseases don’t have to adopt new names or personas, or go into witness protection programs, to save their vision. But by changing the identity of cells in the retina — namely rods — researchers may someday be able to slow or halt vision loss for those with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other related conditions.

While the innovative therapeutic approach is not ready to be tested in humans, a research team led by Tom Reh, PhD, University of Washington, and Sheng Ding, PhD, University of California, San Francisco, accomplished the feat in mice with RP. The investigators treated rods in the mice with a compound known as photoregulin1 (PR1) that blocked a gene involved in rod development called Nr2e3. That, in turn, reduced the expression (activity) of other rod-associated genes, making the rods less rod-like and more like cones. Doing so stopped retinal degeneration, preserving both rods and cones. Rods and cones are important, because they’re the cells that make vision possible. Results of the PR1 study were published online in the journal Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science.

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