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Posts tagged retinitis pigmentosa

MeiraGTx Treats First Patient in XLRP Gene-Therapy Trial

MeiraGTx, a gene-therapy company in London and New York City, has treated its first patient in a gene-therapy clinical trial for people with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) caused by mutations in the gene RPGR. The Phase I/II study is taking place at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London. The safety-oriented trial will enroll 36 participants. Three dose levels of the therapy will be evaluated.

XLRP is a leading cause of inherited, progressive retinal degeneration and vision loss. The condition usually affects males, but is also diagnosed occasionally in females. Mutations in the gene RPGR cause about 70 percent of XLRP cases. RPGR mutations affect about 15,000 people in the United States and tens of thousands more around the world.
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FFB-Funded Scientists Report on Nine Promising Translational Research Efforts

Translational research — moving promising science out of laboratories and into clinical trials — is essential to getting vision-saving, retinal-disease treatments out to the millions who need them. With that said, translational research is also costly and high risk and requires extensive clinical development and regulatory knowledge.

The Foundation Fighting Blindness has taken the translational challenge head on by investing more than $75 million in therapy-development projects with strong clinical-trial potential through its Translational Research Acceleration Program (TRAP), which includes Gund-Harrington Scholar Awards.
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SparingVision Formed to Advance Sight-Saving Protein for RP

L to R: Florence Allouche Ghrenassia, PharmD, President, SparingVision; Frédérique Vidal, French Minister of Higher Education, Research and Innovation; José-Alain Sahel, MD, Co-Founder, SparingVision and Fondation Voir & Entendre; David Brint, and Chairman, Foundation Fighting Blindness; and Laure Reinhardt, Deputy CEO, Bpifrance

L to R: Florence Allouche Ghrenassia, PharmD, President, SparingVision; Frédérique Vidal, French Minister of Higher Education, Research and Innovation; José-Alain Sahel, MD, Co-Founder, SparingVision and Fondation Voir & Entendre; David Brint, Chairman, Foundation Fighting Blindness; and Laure Reinhardt, Deputy CEO, Bpifrance

The development of a vision-saving treatment for people with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is getting a major boost thanks to the formation of the French biotech SparingVision to move it into a clinical trial and out to the international marketplace.

A spin-off of the Institut de la Vision, SparingVision was established to clinically develop and commercialize a protein known as rod-derived cone-viability factor (RdCVF). The emerging therapy performed well in several previous lab studies funded by the Foundation Fighting Blindness. SparingVision’s goal is to launch a clinical trial for the protein in 2019.
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Researchers Find Mutation as Frequent Cause of RP in American Hispanics

A Foundation-funded research collaboration identified a mutation in the gene SAG as a frequent cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) in the American Hispanic population. Eight of the 22 Hispanic families with adRP in their whole-exome-sequencing study had the mutation. The discovery can help genetic experts diagnose more patients with adRP, and it gives researchers a target for developing potential therapies. Results of the SAG study were published in the journal Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science (IOVS).
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ID Your IRD: A Free Genetic Testing Program for Eligible People with Inherited Retinal Diseases


Genes are like the blueprint or code for determining who we are. We all have about 23,000 pairs of genes in most cells in our bodies. Many of our physical attributes — such as height, eye and hair color, and complexion — are determined by our genes.

However, certain misspellings, also known as mutations, in our genetic code can cause diseases or increase our risk for them. In fact, inherited retinal diseases are caused by mutations in single genes.
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jCyte Stem-Cell Therapy Moves into Phase IIb Clinical Trial for RP

These are retinal progenitors.

These are retinal progenitors.

The stem-cell therapy company jCyte is launching a Phase IIb clinical trial of its therapy for people with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The trial is taking place at University of California, Irvine, and Retina-Vitreous Associates Medical Group in Los Angeles. The 70-participant study is being led by Henry Klassen, MD, PhD. Participant enrollment is scheduled to begin this month.

The treatment involves intravitreal injection of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs), which are stem cells that have partially developed into the retinal cells that make vision possible. Based on lab studies, researchers believe the treatment can preserve and potentially rescue the patient’s existing photoreceptors, thereby saving and possibly restoring vision.
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Dr. Eliot Berson, Pioneer in Vitamin A Therapy for Retinitis Pigmentosa, Passes Away

No one in the retinal disease research community brought more passion and commitment to his or her work than Dr. Eliot Berson. As The William F. Chatlos Professor of Ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School, he dedicated himself to clinical care and vision-saving research for people with inherited retinal diseases for five decades. In addition to being a world-renowned clinical researcher and developer of vitamin A therapy for retinitis pigmentosa, he was beloved by his patients and their families for his hopeful and encouraging attitude toward their challenging, vision-robbing conditions.
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Foundation Investing in Drug to Slow Many Forms of RP

Sometimes, fighting blindness means helping people save the vision they have, or at least slowing disease progression enough so they can maintain useful vision for all of their lives.

That’s the idea behind a promising, emerging drug for retinitis pigmentosa (RP) known as N-acetylcysteine-amide (NACA). The Foundation Fighting Blindness Clinical Research Institute (FFB-CRI) has announced an investment of up to $7.5 million to advance the potential therapy into and through a Phase II clinical trial. In several animal models, including previous FFB-funded lab studies of rodent models at Johns Hopkins University, NACA slowed retinal degeneration.

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FFB-CRI Leads Effort to Identify Outcome Measures for Therapies in Clinical Trials

Side view of a retina as captured by SD-OCT. The EZ Width is the yellow line extending between the arrows. The patient has advanced RP with significant loss of peripheral vision.

A key to gaining regulatory approval for an emerging retinal-disease therapy is quickly and accurately demonstrating that it saves or restores vision in a clinical trial. Though the goal sounds simple enough, proving that a potential treatment is working is actually difficult. That’s because commonly used measures of visual function — including visual acuity and visual fields — are not always reliable for evaluating vision changes in many people with inherited retinal conditions.

For example, visual acuity can remain stable for someone with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) for decades. While visual fields for people with RP contract over time, measuring the changes objectively is challenging; results for a given patient can vary significantly, even for the same patient on the same day.
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A Change in Identity Might Someday Save Vision

retina

No, people with inherited retinal diseases don’t have to adopt new names or personas, or go into witness protection programs, to save their vision. But by changing the identity of cells in the retina — namely rods — researchers may someday be able to slow or halt vision loss for those with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and other related conditions.

While the innovative therapeutic approach is not ready to be tested in humans, a research team led by Tom Reh, PhD, University of Washington, and Sheng Ding, PhD, University of California, San Francisco, accomplished the feat in mice with RP. The investigators treated rods in the mice with a compound known as photoregulin1 (PR1) that blocked a gene involved in rod development called Nr2e3. That, in turn, reduced the expression (activity) of other rod-associated genes, making the rods less rod-like and more like cones. Doing so stopped retinal degeneration, preserving both rods and cones. Rods and cones are important, because they’re the cells that make vision possible. Results of the PR1 study were published online in the journal Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science.

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