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Posts tagged photoreceptors

FFB-Funded Scientists Report on Nine Promising Translational Research Efforts

Translational research — moving promising science out of laboratories and into clinical trials — is essential to getting vision-saving, retinal-disease treatments out to the millions who need them. With that said, translational research is also costly and high risk and requires extensive clinical development and regulatory knowledge.

The Foundation Fighting Blindness has taken the translational challenge head on by investing more than $75 million in therapy-development projects with strong clinical-trial potential through its Translational Research Acceleration Program (TRAP), which includes Gund-Harrington Scholar Awards.
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Valproic Acid’s Effect Too Small in One-Year Clinical Trial

However, researchers identify a potentially powerful endpoint for evaluating emerging therapies in future studies.

Results from a clinical trial sponsored by the Foundation Fighting Blindness Clinical Research Institute (FFB-CRI) indicate that valproic acid, a drug approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for seizure disorders, did not sufficiently preserve vision in people with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). FFB-CRI launched the 90-person study in 2010, because previous lab research, and a published clinical report involving a few patients, had suggested the drug might slow vision loss in people with adRP.
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FFB Convenes Experts to Discuss Therapeutic Opportunities for Stargardt Disease

Meeting presenters (left to right): Philip Rosenfeld, MD, PhD; Ilyas Washington, PhD; Peter Charbel Issa, MD, PhD; Elias Traboulsi, MD, MEd; Ulrich Schraermeyer, PhD; Carel Hoyng, PhD; Paul Bernstein, MD, PhD; SriniVas Sadda, MD; Krzysztof Palczewski, PhD; Janet Sparrow, PhD; Artur Cideciyan, PhD; Hendrik Scholl, MD; Patricia Zilliox, PhD (not pictured)

Meeting presenters (left to right): Philip Rosenfeld, MD, PhD; Ilyas Washington, PhD; Peter Charbel Issa, MD, PhD; Elias Traboulsi, MD, MEd; Ulrich Schraermeyer, PhD; Carel Hoyng, PhD; Paul Bernstein, MD, PhD; SriniVas Sadda, MD; Krzysztof Palczewski, PhD; Janet Sparrow, PhD; Artur Cideciyan, PhD; Hendrik Scholl, MD; Patricia Zilliox, PhD (not pictured)

Stargardt disease is the world’s leading cause of inherited macular degeneration, affecting 30,000 people in the United States alone. It is also a challenging condition to understand and treat. While Stargardt disease often causes severe loss of central eyesight, its effect on vision and the retina can vary widely from patient to patient. The disease usually strikes in childhood or adolescence, but there are forms that cause significant vision loss much later in life. Also, a patient’s vision can remain stable for many years before a relatively sudden, steep decline occurs.

The Foundation Fighting Blindness Clinical Research Institute (FFB-CRI) convened 70 of the world’s top Stargardt disease research experts in Cleveland, Ohio, on February 17, 2017, to discuss these challenges and the current state of therapy development. Much of the information and data shared during the meeting came out of ProgSTAR, the FFB-CRI-funded natural history study of 365 Stargardt disease patients.
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FFB-CRI Leads Effort to Identify Outcome Measures for Therapies in Clinical Trials

Side view of a retina as captured by SD-OCT. The EZ Width is the yellow line extending between the arrows. The patient has advanced RP with significant loss of peripheral vision.

A key to gaining regulatory approval for an emerging retinal-disease therapy is quickly and accurately demonstrating that it saves or restores vision in a clinical trial. Though the goal sounds simple enough, proving that a potential treatment is working is actually difficult. That’s because commonly used measures of visual function — including visual acuity and visual fields — are not always reliable for evaluating vision changes in many people with inherited retinal conditions.

For example, visual acuity can remain stable for someone with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) for decades. While visual fields for people with RP contract over time, measuring the changes objectively is challenging; results for a given patient can vary significantly, even for the same patient on the same day.
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To Treat an Inherited Retinal Disease, It’s Good to Know Exactly What’s Wrong with the Gene

Jason Comander, M.D., Ph.D.In simple terms, genes are like recipes for making proteins. All the cells in our bodies “read” genetic information so they can make the critical proteins necessary to stay healthy and function properly. If there is a mistake in a gene — that is, a misspelling — a protein might not be made correctly and cells in the retina might degenerate and cause vision loss.

These misspellings are called mutations, and just like a mistake in a recipe, some mutations are more devastating than others. For example, when baking a cake, let’s say there is an error in the recipe. It incorrectly calls for a quarter cup of sugar, when the right amount is a half of a cup. The cake may not taste great, but it is still edible. But let’s say the instruction for adding flour is omitted entirely. Then the cake will be a complete failure and go uneaten.

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Optogenetic Therapy Takes First Step Forward in Clinical Trial

Retrosense logoRetroSense Therapeutics has reported that three participants have received injections of its potential optogenetic therapy, known as RST-01, in a Phase I/II clinical trial. The patients were given the lowest dose of RST-01, and no adverse ocular events were observed. Furthermore, the treatment showed some biological activity, though RetroSense did not provide details about what that activity was or what it meant.

More information on safety and efficacy will likely be reported about the RetroSense trial after more trial participants have been observed over a longer period of time, and after discussions with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Continue Reading…

Fascinating Facts About Retinal Cells

Diagram of retinal cellsYour eyes are not just windows to your soul, but to your health as well. People rarely pay attention to their eyes, until something goes wrong. The eye is a delicate organ, and vision is a complex process involving various components.
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