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Posts tagged lca

Gene Therapy Strengthens the Retina’s Connection to the Brain

diagram of brain affected by LCA therapyWhile we often think of the retina as that magical piece of tissue lining the back of the eye that makes vision possible, the brain is also an essential partner in the visual process. When light comes into the eye and is converted to electrical signals, those signals are sent through the optic nerve to the back of the brain, where they are transformed into the images we see. When children are born, pathways between the retina and the brain are in place, and, with increased interaction with the world, they become stronger over time.
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VISIONS 2015 – Dr. Shannon Boye Receives FFB Award for Excellence in Gene-Therapy Research

Shannon Boye accepting the awardWhen it comes to developing innovative gene therapies for retinal diseases, few researchers are doing more than Shannon Boye, Ph.D., and her laboratory staff of 10 at the University of Florida. In addition to advancing a gene therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) caused by GUCY2D mutations toward a human study, Dr. Boye and her team are enhancing gene-delivery systems by making them safer to administer and able to carry larger payloads than current systems.
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Promising Research Highlighted at Meeting of Retinal Gene Therapy Experts

genesWhen it comes to fighting blinding retinal diseases, nothing has been more exciting than the advancement of gene therapies into clinical trials. And, with human studies of gene therapies now underway for Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA, RPE65 mutations), Usher syndrome type 1B, Stargardt disease, retinoschisis, choroideremia and retinitis pigmentosa (MERTK mutations), scientists are gaining new knowledge every day about the best technologies and methodologies for gene-therapy development.
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Need-to-Know Information about Clinical Trials

clinical trial patientWith about 15 clinical trials underway for inherited retinal diseases, and several more poised to begin in a few years, patients are eager to sign up for access to potential vision-saving therapies.
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The Top Research Advancements of 2014: How Fast Can We Go?

lab photoAs we approach 2015, it’s inspiring to look back on 2014 and recount the numerous advancements we’ve made in developing vision-saving treatments and cures. When I joined the Foundation nearly a decade ago, virtually nothing was in a human study. We were curing lots of blind mice, and clinical trials seemed elusive. But, today, more than a dozen promising therapies are being evaluated in people, and at least a dozen more clinical trials are expected to begin in the next few years.
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Holiday Giving Means Doubling Your Gift

Allison Corona videoFor many reasons—not the least of which are holiday-related—December is a month when we all consider ways to give to others. And the spirit of giving has never been more apparent than it is right now at the Foundation Fighting Blindness. Not only is our end-of-year fundraising campaign in full swing; it’s bolstered by the Chairman’s Holiday Match. What that means is, for every dollar someone gives, it’ll be matched by another dollar—thus doubling its value. Give $25, it’s worth $50. Give $50, it’s worth $100. And so on.
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Changing Someone’s Life: A New Video Emphasizes the Need to Support FFB’s Mission

Allison CoronaGrowing up, Allison Corona could see shapes and silhouettes, but not the faces of loved ones clearly enough to know if they were happy or sad. She needed a cane to navigate her schools’ hallways. And in a dark room, or outside at night, she was completely blind. “It was like living a half-life,” Allison, 22, recalls in a new FFB video, “Restoring Sight, One Treatment at a Time.”
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VISIONS 2014 – The Multi-Talented Dr. Shannon Boye

Shannon BoyeShannon Boye, Ph.D., is something of a rock star here at the VISIONS 2014 conference. Serving as a panelist in sessions on gene therapy and clinical trials, the University of Florida assistant professor has won compliments for her skill in explaining complicated research in plain English. And her compassion for those affected by retinal diseases is plain to see.
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ARVO 2014: LCA Gene Therapy Recipient Featured During Keynote

Yannick Duwe and his father, Tony, at ARVOGene-therapy pioneer Jean Bennett, M.D., Ph.D., may have been the keynote speaker for the closing session at the annual meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), but Yannick Duwe, a 15-year-old patient with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) who was treated in her clinical trial six years ago, stole the show. He and his father, Tony, were part of a panel which also included members of Dr. Bennett’s research team.
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Giving Thanks

The Foundation gives thanks to its supporters.How do you thank the tens of thousands of people who’ve contributed in so many ways this past year – volunteer work, donations, research advances, etc. – to help FFB eradicate retinal diseases? Aside from giving a general shout-out to those folks (you know who you are, including Eye on the Cure readers), we can offer highlights, a sampling, if you will, of the many achievements Foundation supporters have helped make happen this past year.
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