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Posts tagged Johns Hopkins University

FFB Convenes Experts to Discuss Therapeutic Opportunities for Stargardt Disease

Meeting presenters (left to right): Philip Rosenfeld, MD, PhD; Ilyas Washington, PhD; Peter Charbel Issa, MD, PhD; Elias Traboulsi, MD, MEd; Ulrich Schraermeyer, PhD; Carel Hoyng, PhD; Paul Bernstein, MD, PhD; SriniVas Sadda, MD; Krzysztof Palczewski, PhD; Janet Sparrow, PhD; Artur Cideciyan, PhD; Hendrik Scholl, MD; Patricia Zilliox, PhD (not pictured)

Meeting presenters (left to right): Philip Rosenfeld, MD, PhD; Ilyas Washington, PhD; Peter Charbel Issa, MD, PhD; Elias Traboulsi, MD, MEd; Ulrich Schraermeyer, PhD; Carel Hoyng, PhD; Paul Bernstein, MD, PhD; SriniVas Sadda, MD; Krzysztof Palczewski, PhD; Janet Sparrow, PhD; Artur Cideciyan, PhD; Hendrik Scholl, MD; Patricia Zilliox, PhD (not pictured)

Stargardt disease is the world’s leading cause of inherited macular degeneration, affecting 30,000 people in the United States alone. It is also a challenging condition to understand and treat. While Stargardt disease often causes severe loss of central eyesight, its effect on vision and the retina can vary widely from patient to patient. The disease usually strikes in childhood or adolescence, but there are forms that cause significant vision loss much later in life. Also, a patient’s vision can remain stable for many years before a relatively sudden, steep decline occurs.

The Foundation Fighting Blindness Clinical Research Institute (FFB-CRI) convened 70 of the world’s top Stargardt disease research experts in Cleveland, Ohio, on February 17, 2017, to discuss these challenges and the current state of therapy development. Much of the information and data shared during the meeting came out of ProgSTAR, the FFB-CRI-funded natural history study of 365 Stargardt disease patients.
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Foundation Investing in Drug to Slow Many Forms of RP

Sometimes, fighting blindness means helping people save the vision they have, or at least slowing disease progression enough so they can maintain useful vision for all of their lives.

That’s the idea behind a promising, emerging drug for retinitis pigmentosa (RP) known as N-acetylcysteine-amide (NACA). The Foundation Fighting Blindness Clinical Research Institute (FFB-CRI) has announced an investment of up to $7.5 million to advance the potential therapy into and through a Phase II clinical trial. In several animal models, including previous FFB-funded lab studies of rodent models at Johns Hopkins University, NACA slowed retinal degeneration.

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