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Posts tagged ipsc

Nobel-Prize-Winning Stem-Cell Researcher Delivers Keynote at FFB-Funded Conference in Kyoto

Shinya Yamanaka, M.D., Ph.D.It was only 10 years ago that Shinya Yamanaka, M.D., Ph.D., discovered how to convert a person’s skin cells into stem cells by tweaking just four genes. The historical breakthrough landed Dr. Yamanaka the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology-Medicine, because it meant that patients could be their own stem-cell donors. Known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), they are now being used to develop powerful therapies and drug-screening tools including those for the retina.

To the delight of nearly 300 retinal researchers from around the world attending the FFB-funded RD2016 meeting, September 19-24 in Kyoto, Japan, Dr. Yamanka discussed his early clinical trial for iPSC-derived retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells for a 78-year-old woman with advanced wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The study met its main goal – safety – and he and his collaborator, Masayo Takahashi, M.D., Ph.D., are planning to treat additional patients in the near future.

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Japanese Group Plans Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Clinical Trial

Rod cells derived from iPSC at the RIKEN labs.I just learned some promising news from the stem cell research front. RIKEN, an innovative research group in Japan, is hoping to launch a clinical trial of an age-related macular degeneration (AMD) treatment derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC). Based on my current knowledge, this would be the first-ever iPSC-based treatment for the retina to move into a human study.
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The Importance of Stem Cells (a guest post from Dr. David Gamm)

Dr. David Gamm

Photograph by Andy Manis.

When I joined the University of Wisconsin (UW) in 2003, I saw stem cell research as having great potential to benefit patients with retinal degenerations. I also saw stem cells as a way to answer basic science questions about the retina and the conditions that affect it. As a scientist and a pediatric ophthalmologist, these goals were really important to me.
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