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Posts tagged genetics

Researchers Find Mutation as Frequent Cause of RP in American Hispanics

A Foundation-funded research collaboration identified a mutation in the gene SAG as a frequent cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP) in the American Hispanic population. Eight of the 22 Hispanic families with adRP in their whole-exome-sequencing study had the mutation. The discovery can help genetic experts diagnose more patients with adRP, and it gives researchers a target for developing potential therapies. Results of the SAG study were published in the journal Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science (IOVS).
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ARVO 2016: High-School Sophomore Finds Gene Mutation in Family with Choroideremia

Aditya A. Guru explaining his posterWhile I was perusing posters on genetic research in the exhibit hall at the ARVO annual meeting, Radha Ayyagari, Ph.D., an FFB-funded genetic scientist from the University of California, San Diego took me by the arm and said, “Come with me. There’s something you really need to see.”
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A Surprising Number of Carrier Females are Affected by X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa

Calico catX-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) is an inherited retinal disease causing significant vision loss, sometimes complete blindness, in males. Females are often considered to be unaffected carriers of the condition, with a 50 percent chance of passing XLRP to their sons.
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Genetics 101: How Some Retinal Diseases are Inherited

Egg and spermLong before the advent of genetic testing, or even knowledge of DNA and RNA, astute observers noticed that many traits were passed from one generation to another. But it still can be difficult to understand why some people inherit a genetic disease and others do not. Also, it’s often not clear which family members are at risk of inheriting a condition.
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DHA and EPA for Stargardt Disease — an Evolving Story

Dr. David KrizajI’ve been conducting or overseeing scientific research for more than 40 years (yikes!), but I continue to be humbled by its nuances, complexities and ambiguities. Sometimes, just when you think you have something figured out, you find evidence to the contrary. Sometimes, as Vladimir Lenin said, progress is made by taking “one step back, two steps forward.”
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