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Posts tagged fda

Clinical Trial Authorized in the U.S. for Emerging LCA 10 Therapy

ProQR, a biotechnology company in the Netherlands, has received authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to start a Phase I/II clinical trial for its therapy known as QR-110, which is being developed for Leber congenital amaurosis type 10 (LCA 10). The genetic retinal condition causes severe vision loss in children. QR-110 targets the specific mutation p.Cys998X in the CEP290 gene, also known as c.2991+1655A>G mutation. It is estimated that it affects about 2,000 people in the Western world.

QR-110 was a featured topic at the annual meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) in Baltimore, May 7-11. About 12,000 eye researchers and industry professionals attended the event.
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Unregulated Stem-Cell Therapy Causes Severe Vision Loss for Three Florida Women

A report today in The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) describes the cases of three women with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) who lost much of their eyesight after receiving ocular injections of stem cells derived from their own fat tissue. All of the women had good enough eyesight to drive before the procedures. Each paid $5,000 to receive the injections from a private clinic in Sunrise, Florida. The New York Times and other major media outlets have published news stories on the NEJM report.
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Foundation Investing in Drug to Slow Many Forms of RP

Sometimes, fighting blindness means helping people save the vision they have, or at least slowing disease progression enough so they can maintain useful vision for all of their lives.

That’s the idea behind a promising, emerging drug for retinitis pigmentosa (RP) known as N-acetylcysteine-amide (NACA). The Foundation Fighting Blindness Clinical Research Institute (FFB-CRI) has announced an investment of up to $7.5 million to advance the potential therapy into and through a Phase II clinical trial. In several animal models, including previous FFB-funded lab studies of rodent models at Johns Hopkins University, NACA slowed retinal degeneration.

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FFB-CRI Leads Effort to Identify Outcome Measures for Therapies in Clinical Trials

Side view of a retina as captured by SD-OCT. The EZ Width is the yellow line extending between the arrows. The patient has advanced RP with significant loss of peripheral vision.

A key to gaining regulatory approval for an emerging retinal-disease therapy is quickly and accurately demonstrating that it saves or restores vision in a clinical trial. Though the goal sounds simple enough, proving that a potential treatment is working is actually difficult. That’s because commonly used measures of visual function — including visual acuity and visual fields — are not always reliable for evaluating vision changes in many people with inherited retinal conditions.

For example, visual acuity can remain stable for someone with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) for decades. While visual fields for people with RP contract over time, measuring the changes objectively is challenging; results for a given patient can vary significantly, even for the same patient on the same day.
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Back in Baltimore – VISIONS 2016, FFB’s National Conference, Returns to Its Founding City

Baltimore's Inner HarborFor the second year in a row, the Foundation Fighting Blindness’ national conference — this year titled VISIONS 2016 — will take place in FFB’s founding city of Baltimore, Maryland, June 30-July 3. More than 500 people are expected to attend the event, which will offer dozens of research- and lifestyle-focused sessions designed for people who are visually impaired and sighted as well.
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Treatments for Retinal Diseases are Leading to Therapies for the Brain

An image of the brainThe retina—the thin, fragile layer of tissue lining the back of the eye—gives us the invaluable gift of vision. It works like film or digital sensors in a camera by converting the light that enters our eye into electrical signals. Those signals are sent over the optic nerve to the back of the brain, where they are used to create the images we see.
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A Leap Forward: Spark Therapeutics Seeks FDA Approval for its Vision-Restoring Gene Therapy

Gene therapy recipient Yannick DuweWe’re approaching a critical milestone in the fight against blinding retinal diseases, and it has the potential to tremendously boost and accelerate the advancement of virtually all gene therapies in development for dozens of inherited retinal diseases.

Sometime in 2016, Spark Therapeutics will request marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its landmark gene therapy for retinal conditions caused by mutations in the gene RPE65, namely certain forms of Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa.
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Gene Therapy Strengthens the Retina’s Connection to the Brain

diagram of brain affected by LCA therapyWhile we often think of the retina as that magical piece of tissue lining the back of the eye that makes vision possible, the brain is also an essential partner in the visual process. When light comes into the eye and is converted to electrical signals, those signals are sent through the optic nerve to the back of the brain, where they are transformed into the images we see. When children are born, pathways between the retina and the brain are in place, and, with increased interaction with the world, they become stronger over time.
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Argus II “Bionic Retina” Receives Recommendation for FDA Approval

Video Included:
Graphic of the Argus II Prosthesis device
You wouldn’t think that the ability to sort black, white and grey socks would be a big deal for a successful attorney, but when that lawyer is completely blind from retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and used a “bionic retina” to accomplish the simple task, well, that is a big deal.
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One and Done: The Next Revolution in Treating Wet AMD

Doctor and PatientToday, most people who develop wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) can retain much of their vision thanks to the advent of three treatment options, all administered through repeated ocular injections.

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