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Posts tagged clinical trial

ProQR Doses First Participant in Its LCA10 Therapy Clinical Trial

ProQR, a biotech company in the Netherlands, has treated its first patient in a Phase 1/2 clinical trial for QR-110, a therapy for people with Leber congenital amaurosis 10 (LCA10), which is caused by the p.Cys998X mutation in the CEP290 gene. The mutation is estimated to affect about 2,000 people in the Western world.

The Phase 1/2 trial will enroll six children and six adults who have the mutation. Participants will receive a dose in one eye every three months for a year. The treatment is delivered through an injection into the vitreous, the gel-like substance in the middle of the eye.
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FDA Committee Unanimously Recommends Approval for Spark’s RPE65 Gene Therapy – Final Decision Due in January 2018

Ashley and Cole Carper traveled from Little Rock, AR, to tell their family’s story at the FDA hearing.

Ashley and Cole Carper traveled from Little Rock, AR, to tell their family’s story at the FDA hearing.

Spark Therapeutics has taken a major step closer to gaining marketing approval for its vision-restoring gene therapy for people with RPE65 mutations causing Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and retinitis pigmentosa. At the conclusion of a public hearing on October 12, 2017, an advisory committee comprised of FDA-selected experts voted unanimously – 16 to 0 – to recommend approval. The FDA is due to make a final decision on marketing approval for the treatment, known as voretigene neparvovec, by January 12, 2018.

The event held at FDA headquarters included the presentation of trial results from Spark representatives, as well as compelling testimony from patients, family members, and industry stakeholders.

Twenty-four-year-old Katelyn Corey told hearing attendees that before receiving the treatment, her constant adaptation to dwindling vision didn’t leave time for much else in her life. But her circumstances changed dramatically in December 2013, after she received the RPE65 gene therapy in Spark’s Phase III clinical trial.
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MeiraGTx Treats First Patient in XLRP Gene-Therapy Trial

MeiraGTx, a gene-therapy company in London and New York City, has treated its first patient in a gene-therapy clinical trial for people with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) caused by mutations in the gene RPGR. The Phase I/II study is taking place at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London. The safety-oriented trial will enroll 36 participants. Three dose levels of the therapy will be evaluated.

XLRP is a leading cause of inherited, progressive retinal degeneration and vision loss. The condition usually affects males, but is also diagnosed occasionally in females. Mutations in the gene RPGR cause about 70 percent of XLRP cases. RPGR mutations affect about 15,000 people in the United States and tens of thousands more around the world.
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Twelve People Receive XLRS Gene Therapy in AGTC’s Clinical Trial

Applied Genetics Technology Corporation (AGTC) reported that its gene therapy for X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) has performed encouragingly in a Phase I/II, safety-oriented clinical trial taking place at seven sites in the U.S.

XLRS is an inherited disease that leads to significant vision loss due to splitting of the layers of the retina. The condition affects about 35,000 males in the U.S. and Europe. XLRS is caused by mutations in the gene retinoschisin. AGTC’s gene therapy uses a human-engineered virus — and adeno-associated virus or AAV — to deliver normal copies of retinoschisin to the patient’s retina.
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SparingVision Formed to Advance Sight-Saving Protein for RP

L to R: Florence Allouche Ghrenassia, PharmD, President, SparingVision; Frédérique Vidal, French Minister of Higher Education, Research and Innovation; José-Alain Sahel, MD, Co-Founder, SparingVision and Fondation Voir & Entendre; David Brint, and Chairman, Foundation Fighting Blindness; and Laure Reinhardt, Deputy CEO, Bpifrance

L to R: Florence Allouche Ghrenassia, PharmD, President, SparingVision; Frédérique Vidal, French Minister of Higher Education, Research and Innovation; José-Alain Sahel, MD, Co-Founder, SparingVision and Fondation Voir & Entendre; David Brint, Chairman, Foundation Fighting Blindness; and Laure Reinhardt, Deputy CEO, Bpifrance

The development of a vision-saving treatment for people with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is getting a major boost thanks to the formation of the French biotech SparingVision to move it into a clinical trial and out to the international marketplace.

A spin-off of the Institut de la Vision, SparingVision was established to clinically develop and commercialize a protein known as rod-derived cone-viability factor (RdCVF). The emerging therapy performed well in several previous lab studies funded by the Foundation Fighting Blindness. SparingVision’s goal is to launch a clinical trial for the protein in 2019.
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Valproic Acid’s Effect Too Small in One-Year Clinical Trial

However, researchers identify a potentially powerful endpoint for evaluating emerging therapies in future studies.

Results from a clinical trial sponsored by the Foundation Fighting Blindness Clinical Research Institute (FFB-CRI) indicate that valproic acid, a drug approved by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for seizure disorders, did not sufficiently preserve vision in people with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). FFB-CRI launched the 90-person study in 2010, because previous lab research, and a published clinical report involving a few patients, had suggested the drug might slow vision loss in people with adRP.
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Clinical Trial Authorized in the U.S. for Emerging LCA 10 Therapy

ProQR, a biotechnology company in the Netherlands, has received authorization from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to start a Phase I/II clinical trial for its therapy known as QR-110, which is being developed for Leber congenital amaurosis type 10 (LCA 10). The genetic retinal condition causes severe vision loss in children. QR-110 targets the specific mutation p.Cys998X in the CEP290 gene, also known as c.2991+1655A>G mutation. It is estimated that it affects about 2,000 people in the Western world.

QR-110 was a featured topic at the annual meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) in Baltimore, May 7-11. About 12,000 eye researchers and industry professionals attended the event.
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jCyte Stem-Cell Therapy Moves into Phase IIb Clinical Trial for RP

These are retinal progenitors.

These are retinal progenitors.

The stem-cell therapy company jCyte is launching a Phase IIb clinical trial of its therapy for people with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The trial is taking place at University of California, Irvine, and Retina-Vitreous Associates Medical Group in Los Angeles. The 70-participant study is being led by Henry Klassen, MD, PhD. Participant enrollment is scheduled to begin this month.

The treatment involves intravitreal injection of retinal progenitor cells (RPCs), which are stem cells that have partially developed into the retinal cells that make vision possible. Based on lab studies, researchers believe the treatment can preserve and potentially rescue the patient’s existing photoreceptors, thereby saving and possibly restoring vision.
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A Steady Hand in Saving Vision

Dr. Robert MacLaren performing eye surgery.A retinal researcher can develop the best vision-saving stem-cell or gene therapy ever imagined, but if the doctor or surgeon can’t deliver it to the retina safely and effectively, the treatment is worthless. It could even be harmful.
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Fighting Blindness Gets Sheepish

A sheep in tall grass.We all know from the nursery rhyme “Mary Had a Little Lamb” that “everywhere that Mary went, the lamb was sure to go.” But what if the lamb had a vision-robbing retinal disease, making it challenging to find Mary prancing around a sunlit meadow, or catching some rays on the Jersey Shore?
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