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Posts tagged Casey Eye Institute

Forty High-Impact Retinal-Research Efforts Highlighted at FFB-Casey Innovation Summit

Hosted by the Foundation Fighting Blindness and Casey Eye Institute at Oregon Health & Science University, the Innovation Summit for Retinal Cell and Gene Therapy has emerged as one of the most essential events for researchers and companies developing treatments and cures for retinal degenerative diseases.

In its fifth year, the Innovation Summit featured 40 presentations from industry experts from around the world. More than 250 people were in attendance. The event was held on April 27, the day before the annual meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) in Honolulu.
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VISIONS 2016 – Dr. Richard Weleber Receives FFB’s Highest Research Honor, Recognized in Touching Video

Dr. Richard WeleberConsidering all that Richard Weleber, M.D., has accomplished over four decades —
including leadership and oversight of clinical trials for emerging retinal-disease therapies and innovations in retina imaging and functional evaluation at the world-renowned Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University — it comes as no surprise that he’s been given FFB’s Llura Liggett Gund Award for career achievement. Dr. Weleber became the 10th recipient of the Foundation’s highest honor, named after FFB co-founder Lulie Gund, during the opening lunch of the VISIONS 2016 conference.
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ARVO 2016: What Does It Take to Develop a Stem-Cell Therapy for the Retina?

Drs. Jeffrey Stern and Sally TempleThe effort to restore vision lost to retinal diseases using stem cells can sound so tantalizing simple. The researcher gets some stem cells, turns them into retinal cells, puts them in the patient’s retina to replace lost cells and—voila!—the patient can see again.
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Promising Research Highlighted at Meeting of Retinal Gene Therapy Experts

genesWhen it comes to fighting blinding retinal diseases, nothing has been more exciting than the advancement of gene therapies into clinical trials. And, with human studies of gene therapies now underway for Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA, RPE65 mutations), Usher syndrome type 1B, Stargardt disease, retinoschisis, choroideremia and retinitis pigmentosa (MERTK mutations), scientists are gaining new knowledge every day about the best technologies and methodologies for gene-therapy development.
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