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Posts tagged amd

Treatments for Retinal Diseases are Leading to Therapies for the Brain

An image of the brainThe retina—the thin, fragile layer of tissue lining the back of the eye—gives us the invaluable gift of vision. It works like film or digital sensors in a camera by converting the light that enters our eye into electrical signals. Those signals are sent over the optic nerve to the back of the brain, where they are used to create the images we see.
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Past Sun Exposure Increases AMD Risk

FFB staff members taking preventive measuresIf you’re a young or middle-aged adult who enjoys being outside in the bright sunshine, you’re probably not thinking about the risk for going blind from age-related macular degeneration (AMD). But according to a new study published in the journal Retina, you should be.
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Donated Eyes Help Researchers Better Understand Retinal Diseases

a retina affected by RPMany people with retinal conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration don’t think they can donate their eyes after they’ve passed away. They can’t imagine anyone would want eyes that didn’t work well. But in reality, affected eyes are in big demand.
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First AMD Patient Receives Argus II Bionic Retina

Ray Flynn wearing the Argus IIThere’s nothing more exciting than news about vision restoration for someone blind from a retinal disease. But a report coming from across the pond is especially compelling, because it’s about the first person with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) to receive the Argus II bionic retina.
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ARVO 2015 Highlight: AMD Gene Therapy Performs Encouragingly in Human Study

an AMD eyeWhile treatments such as Lucentis®, Avastin®, and Eylea® have been saving and restoring vision for people with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) over the last several years, they have a significant drawback: The therapies require regular injections into the eye—in some cases, monthly—for the life of the patient.
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CME – What It Is, and Why People with Retinal Diseases Should Know About It

Dr. FishmanIn this Q&A, Gerald Fishman, M.D., a world-renowned clinical researcher and longstanding member of FFB’s Scientific Advisory Board, discusses cystoid macular edema (CME), a potentially damaging accumulation of fluid in the retina affecting up to 32 percent of people with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and related conditions. It’s a complication that can make matters worse for retinas already fragile from degenerative disease. While diagnosis isn’t always straightforward, CME can be treated to minimize vision loss.
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FFB Goes Live to Help Save Vision

Save Your Vision Live!It’s no mystery that the Foundation Fighting Blindness’ core mission is funding research for treatments and cures of retinal diseases, and that we’re making significant progress. A recent influx of clinical, or human, trials of drug, gene and stem-cell therapies is proof. But another key FFB focus is informing the masses about retinal diseases through our public health-education program.
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Social Media Alert: Top 13 Retinal Research Advancements of 2013

Top 13 Retinal Research Advancement of 2013I admittedly am not a heavy social-media user — I am not much for “tweeting” — but as I put together this list of the top retinal research advancements of 2013, I realized it would make great content for social media. Of course, my FFB colleagues will be sure to get the list out via our Facebook and Twitter pages.
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Stem-Cell Research: Moving at the Speed of Light

Dr. Dennis CleggWhen it comes to designing stem-cell-based treatments for retinal diseases, Dennis Clegg, Ph.D., is one of the go-to researchers. He not only heads his own lab at the University of California at Santa Barbara; he’s the recipient of a CIRM grant for a treatment of age-related macular degeneration, and can turn complicated science into a compelling narrative, as this TED Talk demonstrates.
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All-Star Vision

When the Baltimore Orioles’ Adam Jones makes a great catch — a feat the Gold Glove centerfielder accomplishes on a regular basis — he isn’t thinking about his retinas. But in the five seconds it takes a baseball to leave an opponent’s bat and reach Jones’ glove, his retinas are processing an enormous amount of real-time visual information — continual changes in the contrast, velocity and trajectory of the ball as it rockets out of the infield, reaches high into the stadium lights (or the sun) and descends into the outfield.
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