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Meet Steve Rose

Steve Rose

Stephen Rose, Ph.D.
Chief Research Officer
Foundation Fighting Blindness

As the Foundation Fighting Blindness’ chief research officer, Dr. Stephen Rose – who prefers to be called Steve – is highly respected for his expertise, intelligence and tireless commitment to finding treatments and cures for vision-robbing retinal diseases. But it’s his accessibility and down-to-earth nature that stand out for many of his peers and Foundation members.

“With Steve, the door is always open. You can walk into his office at almost any time with a problem or an issue, and he is ready and willing to help,” says Dr. Brian Mansfield, the Foundation’s deputy chief research officer. “He also has a phenomenal memory and knowledge base to draw from. And in the event he doesn’t have an immediate answer for you, he’ll pick up the phone and reach out to his many friends and collaborators throughout the science community. The man is incredibly well-connected.”

Steve, who has a Ph.D. in microbiology and joined the Foundation in 2004, supervises its research efforts, which include awarding grants and facilitating clinical trials. He also manages the Science department and works closely with the Foundation’s Scientific Advisory Board, Board of Directors and Science Liaison Committee. Before joining the Foundation, he served more than 14 years with the National Institutes of Health, where he led several divisions, including genetics, clinical research and transplantation studies.

He’s also a member of many prominent scientific and research organizations, including: the Health Research Alliance, the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy, the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology and the American Association of Immunologists.

Despite his background, Steve has a knack for explaining scientific concepts and retinal research in terms that everyone understands, making him a popular speaker at Foundation and retinal-field events. Bill Schmidt, the Foundation’s chief executive officer, appreciates Steve for, among other things, his enthusiasm.

“There’s no one more passionate about retinal research,” Bill says, “and he does all he can to ensure that the Foundation supports only the best projects — those with strong sight-saving potential. There’s no better advocate for those who’ve lost or are losing their sight, and our recent success in driving research into the clinic is great evidence of that.”

14 Responses to 'Meet Steve Rose'

  1. Dan Haake says:

    I have an eye condition called CACD and am interested in any information regarding research on this desease.

    • EyeOnTheCure says:

      Dan,

      From the research literature, it appears that CACD – also known as central areolar choroidal dystrophy – can look in some ways like the dry form of age-related macular degeneration. CACD affects different regions of the retina including the choroid, retinal pigment epithelium, and photoreceptors. It appears that several cases of CACD are linked to defects in a gene called RDS (or PRPH2). Some are linked to mutations in GUCY2D.

      There are gene therapy studies ongoing for other retinal diseases linked to GUCY2D. There has also been some work on RDS gene therapy for other retinal diseases. We don’t know how well this research would apply to CACD.

      If you would like to discuss CACD further, contact us at info@fightblindness.org.

  2. Barbara Becker says:

    My 83 year old father is suffering from and. He lives in boynton beach Florida. His left eye is real bad and right eye had cataract surgery but vision is poor. Doctors do not offer him hope and his is pretty depressed. Is there someone in his area that you can recommend him seeing?

  3. Felicia B says:

    I have RP Could you please send me more informarion

  4. esther says:

    Iam a 33years old suffering from RP please I want to know if this disease could affect my child when I get pregnant.

  5. masoud bakhshaiesh says:

    Dear Dr Rose ,
    The undersigned is from Iran and have come to learn on your foundation helping people to restore the low-vision.
    My mother who is 74 has faced the sudden low-vision problem since January.
    please let me know your email so that I could send you her angiogram of her left eye suffering from low-vision .
    My question is : Does she suffer from AMD ?
    It should be added that her right eye is with strong amblyopia.
    I appreciate your kind valued assistance in this regard and look forward to hearing from you soon.
    Sincerely Yours
    Masoud Bakhshaiesh

    • EyeOnTheCure says:

      Masoud,

      Thanks you for your comment. Unfortunately we are not in a position to provide individuals with medical advice or provide a diagnosis. We advise you and your mother to visit an eye doctor or retinal specialist. They will be best suited to make an examination and learn more. We wish you and your family the best during this difficult time. Please let us know if we can assist further.

  6. EyeOnTheCure says:

    Thank you for your message Rita.

    We would like to point you to a few places on our website that will provide some useful information. Be sure to visit our section on RP:

    http://www.blindness.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=50&Itemid=67

    There is a section on this page that discusses research advancements. While there is no cure for RP, much research is being done.

    We often report on new research advancements and so we encourage you to check out our RP written articles information

    http://www.blindness.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=category&id=65&Itemid=121

    We hope you find this information helpful. Please let us know if there is anything else we can help you with.

  7. Phyllis Gallaher says:

    I have low vision from wet amd & glaucoma in both eyes. I can read by enlargeing things & using a magnifying glass but I cannot read light printing even by magnifying. This seems to be a very common thing now. Quite often things are printed in white in a light blue background & this is almost impossible for me to read. I am looking for someone respected & in a position to talk about this & make it known how difficult it is for those of us who do not see well. Even enlargeing the print does not help if the print is light.
    Thanks for your help.

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