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Archive for the Prosthetics Category

First AMD Patient Receives Argus II Bionic Retina

Ray Flynn wearing the Argus IIThere’s nothing more exciting than news about vision restoration for someone blind from a retinal disease. But a report coming from across the pond is especially compelling, because it’s about the first person with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) to receive the Argus II bionic retina.
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VISIONS 2015 – Dr. José Sahel Receives Foundation’s Most Prestigious Research Honor

Dr. SahelI’ve known Dr. José Sahel for more than a decade, and every time I’m with him, I’m impressed by his humility and graciousness. He’s not much for rhetoric or small talk, but is always polite and insightful. Dr. Sahel is also very soft-spoken, but I think that’s his secret weapon. He forces you to really listen to what he’s saying.
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Sun and Funds: FFB’s Annual Summer Campaign

Summer Challenge web pageWe all know that Memorial Day is not, technically, the first day of summer. But seeing as we like to stretch summer out as much as possible, it only makes sense to kick it off… well… a few weeks early. The same premise is behind FFB’s Summer Challenge to End Blindness campaign, which began Memorial Day weekend and continues through the upcoming season.
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Bionic Vision Down Under

Participant in BVA human trialIt’s an exciting time in the world of bionic retinas, which are enabling people with blinding retinal diseases to perceive patterns of light. This, in turn, allows them to interpret basic shapes and objects, thereby improving their mobility and independence. Second Sight’s Argus II is available in the United States and Europe, and Retina Implant AG’s Alpha IMS is also on the market in Europe. Many research groups around the world are developing devices as well.
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Nouvelle Lumière: French Bionic Retina in a Human Study

A rendering of Pixium's IRIS device.There’s no doubt that 2013 was a milestone year for bionic retinas. Previously approved for sale in Europe, Second Sight’s Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System received marketing approval in February from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Also, in July, Retina Implant AG gained European marketing approval for its Alpha IMS retinal implant.
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The Foundation’s Center Grants Foster Essential Retinal Research Collaborations

Question: How many researchers does it take to develop a retinal-disease treatment? (No, this isn’t a politically incorrect joke.) The answer is near the end of this article, but no looking ahead!
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The OrCam Device: Giving Back Functionality

Woman wearing the orcamHere, at Eye on the Cure, we’ve recently written quite a bit about retinal prosthetic devices, or “bionic retinas,” whether FDA-approved or works-in-progress. But there’s another new device for the visually impaired, a form of assistive technology, that’s neither disease-specific nor requires an implant. And it’s already on the market, at a relatively low price. It’s called OrCam.
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Patient Registries Help Advance Research for Rare Diseases

Image of Keyboard and StethiscopeRare disease research is challenging, because patient information about the conditions is inherently limited. Patient recruitment for clinical trials can be especially difficult, because so few people are affected.

To address these issues, a number of foundations, patient advocacy groups and governmental institutions have launched online registries to collect patient information for use by researchers, doctors and public health experts.
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The Argus II is Approved. What’s Next for Bionic Retinas?

A Retinal Implant developed by Retina Implant AGAs the Foundation reported back in February, the Argus II retinal prosthesis, developed by Second Sight Medical Products, received marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

For those of us on the front lines of fighting blindness — whether we’re raising funds, conducting  research or stand to personally benefit from the results — the device’s approval is one of the most exciting milestones in vision restoration ever achieved.
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Proving a Vision-Saving Treatment Works

Dr. Hendrik Scholl conducts an electroretinogram, or ERG, with a patient at the Wilmer Eye Institute.I am very excited about ProgSTAR, the Foundation’s new study monitoring and documenting the progress of vision loss and retinal changes in people with Stargardt disease. On the surface, the study might not sound very exciting, because it isn’t evaluating a potential cure. However, the information gleaned from ProgSTAR will be of enormous value in designing future clinical trials for Stargardt disease treatments.
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