Listen to this page using ReadSpeaker
Archive for the Usher syndrome Category

ARVO 2015 Highlight: The National Eye Institute Invests $4 Million in Audacious-Goals Research

future of retinal researchThe National Eye Institute’s (NEI) establishment of its Audacious Goals in 2013 was a watershed moment in the drive to cure blinding retinal diseases. The mission of the program—to regenerate the neurons and neural connections in the eye and visual system—is synonymous with the Foundation’s mission to eradicate retinal diseases. Most important, it means that the NEI is making significant investments in research that will benefit people with retinal conditions, such as retinitis pigmentosa, Usher syndrome, Stargardt disease, and age-related macular degeneration.
Continue Reading…

Need-to-Know Information about Clinical Trials

clinical trial patientWith about 15 clinical trials underway for inherited retinal diseases, and several more poised to begin in a few years, patients are eager to sign up for access to potential vision-saving therapies.
Continue Reading…

“You Don’t Look Blind”

EyeCure - don't look blind 2 bPerhaps the biggest misconception about people affected by retinal diseases is that they see nothing at all. While some have, indeed, gone completely blind, most are in the process of losing their vision. And depending on the person, and the disease, this takes years or decades. In some cases, central vision goes first, in others, peripheral vision.
Continue Reading…

What Everyone with a Retinal Disease Should Know about Vitamin A

blue eyeIf you think of your retinas as the engines that power your vision, then vitamin A is their fuel. Without vitamin A in our diets, we wouldn’t see.
Continue Reading…

For Rare Disease Day, Help Us Fight Retinal Diseases

logo - Rare Disease DaySince its inception in 1971, the Foundation Fighting Blindness has focused its efforts on helping people with rare diseases. In the United States, a rare disease is defined as that which affects fewer than 200,000 people. And, in fact, most vision-robbing retinal diseases—retinitis pigmentosa, Stargardt disease and Usher syndrome included—fall into that category.
Continue Reading…

CME – What It Is, and Why People with Retinal Diseases Should Know About It

Dr. FishmanIn this Q&A, Gerald Fishman, M.D., a world-renowned clinical researcher and longstanding member of FFB’s Scientific Advisory Board, discusses cystoid macular edema (CME), a potentially damaging accumulation of fluid in the retina affecting up to 32 percent of people with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and related conditions. It’s a complication that can make matters worse for retinas already fragile from degenerative disease. While diagnosis isn’t always straightforward, CME can be treated to minimize vision loss.
Continue Reading…

The Story Behind Be My Eyes, a New App for the Blind

Hans WibergConsidering how long trees have been around, it’s hard to believe dendrochronology, the practice of dating trees by their rings, wasn’t invented till the mid-1940s. “Anyone could have come up with that sooner,” Hans Jørgen Wiberg, a 51-year-old Denmark resident, says with a chuckle. “I kind of feel the same way.”
Continue Reading…

Campaigning to End Blindness

Jacob RiderJacob Rider is a 14-year-old Claremont, New Hampshire, resident affected by an inherited retinal disease called Usher syndrome, which causes both hearing and vision loss. He’s also an energetic high-schooler with energy to spare—which makes him an ideal participant in My Campaign to End Blindness, a personalized fundraising program launched by FFB this past summer.
Continue Reading…

Genetics 101: How Some Retinal Diseases are Inherited

Egg and spermLong before the advent of genetic testing, or even knowledge of DNA and RNA, astute observers noticed that many traits were passed from one generation to another. But it still can be difficult to understand why some people inherit a genetic disease and others do not. Also, it’s often not clear which family members are at risk of inheriting a condition.
Continue Reading…

Ready for the Spotlight: Rebecca Alexander Shares Her Story of Living with Usher Syndrome

Rebecca AlexanderFive years ago, when Rebecca Alexander appeared on The Today Show with her brother Peter, she already had quite a tale to share. Nearing 30, she was single, living in New York City and working as a full-time psychotherapist and part-time spinning instructor. She also had Usher syndrome, a disorder that causes both hearing and vision loss—and which she’d mostly kept under wraps.

After the show, “a literary agent asked about writing a book,” recalls Rebecca, whose parents, Terry and David, are national trustees of the Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB). “And I thought, ‘I don’t know what to write about, or that anyone would care.’”
Continue Reading…