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Archive for the LCA Category

First Patient Receives ProQR’s Emerging USH2A Therapy in Clinical Trial

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ProQR, a developer of RNA therapies in the Netherlands, announced that the first clinical-trial participant has received its emerging treatment, which targets retinitis pigmentosa and Usher syndrome caused by mutations in exon 13 of the USH2A gene. The Phase 1/2 clinical trial is taking place at Retina Foundation of the Southwest in Dallas and the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Known as QR-421a, the treatment is intended to slow or potentially reverse vision loss.
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The Foundation Receives a $100,000 Research Grant from Sofia Sees Hope

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Sofia Sees Hope, a nonprofit dedicated to finding treatments and cures for people with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and other inherited retinal diseases (IRDs), has made a $100,000 donation to the Foundation Fighting Blindness to support therapy development and genetic testing.
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FDA Authorizes Clinical Trial for CRISPR/Cas9 Therapy for LCA 10

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Editas Medicine, a company developing gene-editing treatments, has received authorization from the US Food and Drug Administration to launch a clinical trial for its emerging CRISPR/Cas9 therapy for people with a mutation in the gene CEP290, which causes Leber congenital amaurosis 10 (LCA10). LCA causes severe vision loss or blindness at birth.
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Michael Kalberer: Determined to Empower Others and Bring Hope

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Long Island native Michael Kalberer has a knack for connecting with everyone around him, despite being born with cerebral palsy (CP), a disorder that affects a person’s ability to move and maintain balance. The condition can also cause vision loss. At the age of 12, Michael noticed issues with his depth perception and visual field, which resulted in a diagnosis that he was legally blind. At 33 years old, he was finally diagnosed, specifically, with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA).
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A Boy with No Boundaries

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Last summer, Kai Wang devoured 12 audio books on science and engineering feats like the Golden Gate Bridge, atomic bombs, and the cotton gin. He listened to the books over and over — some as many as five times. One of his favorite titles was “Rocket Men,” a 400-page book for adults on Apollo 8, the first manned mission to the moon.  He finished it in a week.

Kai enjoys talking with his mom, Mina, about everything he learns and reads. But it’s not just banter for him — he’s often quizzing her to see what she knows.

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FFB Congratulates RPE65 Gene Therapy Researchers for Champalimaud Award

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More than two decades ago, the Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB) began funding RPE65 gene therapy research that led in late 2017 to LUXTURNA™, the first FDA-approved gene therapy for the eye or an inherited condition. Ultimately, the Foundation provided more than $10 million in funding for the groundbreaking effort.
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Vision Improvements Reported in ProQR’s Clinical Trial for LCA10 Treatment

ProQR, a biotech company in the Netherlands, has reported vision improvements for patients in a Phase 1/2 clinical trial for QR-110, a therapy for people with Leber congenital amaurosis 10 (LCA10), which is caused by the p.Cys998X mutation in the CEP290 gene. The mutation is estimated to affect about 2,000 people in the Western world.

The company reported that 60 percent of subjects in the trial demonstrated improvements in visual acuity and their ability to navigate a mobility course. The treatment was also safe for patients.
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ARVO 2018: Dr. Shannon Boye Reports on her Emerging Gene Therapy for LCA (GUCY2D)

At the annual ARVO research conference in Honolulu, I had an opportunity to talk with FFB-funded researcher Shannon Boye, PhD, University of Florida, about her advancement of gene therapy for Leber congenital amaurosis (GUCY2D mutations) toward a clinical trial.

Natural History Study Launches for LCA Caused by Specific Mutation in CEP290

Massachusetts Eye and Ear (MEE) is participating in a natural history study for people with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) type 10 caused by a mutation referred to as “c.2991+1655A>G” in intron 26 of the CEP290 gene.
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History Is Made: FDA Approves Spark’s Vision-Restoring Gene Therapy

Spark LogoSpark Therapeutics’ vision-restoring RPE65 gene therapy has received marketing approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, becoming the first gene therapy to gain regulatory approval in the U.S. for the eye or any inherited condition.

Known as LUXTURNA™ (voretigene neparvovec), the gene therapy restored vision in a clinical trial for people between the ages of 4 and 44 with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) caused by mutations in the gene RPE65. Study participants with severe vision loss reported putting away their navigational canes, seeing stars, being able to read, and recognizing faces of loved ones. Vision restoration has persisted for at least three years. The treatment is also designed to work for people with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) caused by RPE65 mutations. Continue Reading…