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Archive for the AMD Category

VISIONS 2016 – Dr. Richard Weleber Receives FFB’s Highest Research Honor, Recognized in Touching Video

Dr. Richard WeleberConsidering all that Richard Weleber, M.D., has accomplished over four decades —
including leadership and oversight of clinical trials for emerging retinal-disease therapies and innovations in retina imaging and functional evaluation at the world-renowned Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University — it comes as no surprise that he’s been given FFB’s Llura Liggett Gund Award for career achievement. Dr. Weleber became the 10th recipient of the Foundation’s highest honor, named after FFB co-founder Lulie Gund, during the opening lunch of the VISIONS 2016 conference.
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Back in Baltimore – VISIONS 2016, FFB’s National Conference, Returns to Its Founding City

Baltimore's Inner HarborFor the second year in a row, the Foundation Fighting Blindness’ national conference — this year titled VISIONS 2016 — will take place in FFB’s founding city of Baltimore, Maryland, June 30-July 3. More than 500 people are expected to attend the event, which will offer dozens of research- and lifestyle-focused sessions designed for people who are visually impaired and sighted as well.
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A Steady Hand in Saving Vision

Dr. Robert MacLaren performing eye surgery.A retinal researcher can develop the best vision-saving stem-cell or gene therapy ever imagined, but if the doctor or surgeon can’t deliver it to the retina safely and effectively, the treatment is worthless. It could even be harmful.
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ARVO 2016: What Does It Take to Develop a Stem-Cell Therapy for the Retina?

Drs. Jeffrey Stern and Sally TempleThe effort to restore vision lost to retinal diseases using stem cells can sound so tantalizing simple. The researcher gets some stem cells, turns them into retinal cells, puts them in the patient’s retina to replace lost cells and—voila!—the patient can see again.
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Treatments for Retinal Diseases are Leading to Therapies for the Brain

An image of the brainThe retina—the thin, fragile layer of tissue lining the back of the eye—gives us the invaluable gift of vision. It works like film or digital sensors in a camera by converting the light that enters our eye into electrical signals. Those signals are sent over the optic nerve to the back of the brain, where they are used to create the images we see.
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Retinal Researchers May Be Looking for You

A patient registers with My Retina Tracker.One of the biggest challenges in overcoming rare retinal diseases is, well, that they’re rare. There’s limited information about the conditions in humans, making it difficult for researchers to understand why they cause blindness and develop vision-saving treatments.
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2015 Top 10 Retinal-Research Advances

Researcher in a labThe Foundation Fighting Blindness’ scientists, donors and volunteers made 2015 an outstanding year in our fight against blindness. As I tabulated the year’s top 10 research advances—all made possible through FFB funding—I realized that eight are for clinical trials of emerging therapies that are launching or underway.
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The Gift of Sight – Matched!

Your donation doubledIt’s holiday time, the giving season, when people not only buy gifts for family, friends and co-workers, but also donate to worthy causes—of which there are many. But, if you’ll permit me, I’d like to make a pitch for the Foundation Fighting Blindness (FFB), which happens to be offering a Holiday Board Match, meaning every donation is doubled.
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Past Sun Exposure Increases AMD Risk

FFB staff members taking preventive measuresIf you’re a young or middle-aged adult who enjoys being outside in the bright sunshine, you’re probably not thinking about the risk for going blind from age-related macular degeneration (AMD). But according to a new study published in the journal Retina, you should be.
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Donated Eyes Help Researchers Better Understand Retinal Diseases

a retina affected by RPMany people with retinal conditions such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and age-related macular degeneration don’t think they can donate their eyes after they’ve passed away. They can’t imagine anyone would want eyes that didn’t work well. But in reality, affected eyes are in big demand.
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