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Another Promising Bionic Retina

Video Included:
Video Screenshot
Last February, I blogged about the emergence of “bionic” or artificial retinas for restoring some vision in people who are blind from retinal diseases. In that post, I featured Second Sight’s vision-restoring device, the Argus II, which is now on
the market in Europe and, hopefully, soon in the United States.

Earlier this week, I came across a short video clip from the BBC that does a nice job highlighting a promising bionic retina being developed by a German company called Retina Implant AG. As the video shows, their 1,500-pixel device has restored rudimentary vision in earlier stage clinical trials taking place across Europe and at Wills Eye Institute in Philadelphia. What’s also exciting about their artificial retina is that it doesn’t need a video camera to capture images.

View the Video

I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention that Dr. Jay Federman of Wills will be presenting Retina Implant AG’s artificial retina at our 2012 VISONS Conference, June 28 – July 1, in Minneapolis. Of course, scientists at VISIONS will also be presenting the latest research updates on gene therapies, stem cell treatments, pharmaceuticals and other approaches for saving and restoring vision.

By the way, Minneapolis is absolutely beautiful in the summer. And if you can’t make it to the Twin Cities in summer, there’s always the Maple Lake Ice Fishing Derby in February.


2 Responses to 'Another Promising Bionic Retina'

  1. Since November 27, 2008, I’ve had, what the Dr told me was CRAO. Now it turns out, through my internet research, that it may be CRVO.

    It was a completely painless loss of vision in my left eye.

    I’m a self-employed bookkeeper/accountant and, as you can imagine being blind in my predominant eye has impacted my life terribly.

    I’ve been searching the internet for a possible answer, through gene therapy, to possibly help me cure this life altering situation. My retinal specialist says there’s nothing that can be done.

    • EyeOnTheCure says:

      Hi Dianne, thank you for posting and sharing your story with us. Our focus is on the research behind retinal degenerative diseases and so we can not speak to the treatments that are available for CRVO or CRAO. If you visit the website of the National Eye Institute (http://www.nei.nih.gov/) the resources and contacts available there may be able to point you in the right direction. We wish you all the best.

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